price discrimination


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price discrimination

n
(Commerce) economics the setting of different prices to be charged to different consumers or in different markets for the same goods or services
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Will Kostoris, co-founder of Youtility, said: "Consumers in Merseyside are losing out to price discrimination.
This phenomenon is referred to as price discrimination. It stems from the sellers' incentive to discriminate between high-valuation buyers who have a greater willingness to pay for their purchases and low-valuation buyers who are less willing to pay for these items.
Yet the debate over internet privacy has so far ignored what may be the most significant privacy issue of all: price discrimination. Perhaps you missed it, for example, when in 2017, an Uber executive admitted in an interview with Bloomberg News that the company had taken its familiar "surge pricing" model to a whole new level.
"If we were to adopt Craft's argument, a wholesaler could engage in price discrimination so long as it simply paid the rebates to a corporate parent or any affiliated entity of a licensed retailer," Gants wrote.
It covers essential topics for future managers -- including price discrimination, Porter's five forces, risk sharing and spreading, signalling and screening, credibility and reputation, and economics and organizational behavior.
Major reasons for this dismal performance are lack of mutual trust, price discrimination, trade barriers in the form of rigid custom procedures and tariffs.
Another explanation, offered by Wang and Wright (2017), instead focuses on the price discrimination angle.
To avoid any price discrimination, the company has decided to keep the same prices for both the US and the UK markets giving its customers the maximum advantage in their purchases.
The FCA has published a discussion paper, Price discrimination in the cash savings market, in which it expresses its concerns about the level of competition.
Amazon's price for a one-ounce jar was either $4.49 or $8.99, depending on when you looked." This form of price discrimination is legal as long as it does not occur on the basis of race, ethnicity, gender, or religion.
Merchants already do a fair amount of price discrimination. A car dealer will try to figure out how much you're willing to pay by talking to you while you take a test drive, and try to persuade you to pay more.