microeconomics

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mi·cro·ec·o·nom·ics

 (mī′krō-ĕk′ə-nŏm′ĭks, -ēk′ə-)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of how businesses, households, and individuals within an economy allocate limited resources.

mi′cro·ec′o·nom′ic adj.

microeconomics

(ˌmaɪkrəʊˌiːkəˈnɒmɪks; -ˌɛkə-)
n
(Economics) (functioning as singular) the branch of economics concerned with particular commodities, firms, or individuals and the economic relationships between them. Compare macroeconomics
ˌmicroˌecoˈnomic adj

mi•cro•ec•o•nom•ics

(ˌmaɪ kroʊˌɛk əˈnɒm ɪks, -ˌi kə-)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the branch of economics dealing with particular aspects of an economy, as the price-cost relationship of a firm. Compare macroeconomics.
[1945–50]
mi`cro•ec`o•nom′ic, adj.

microeconomics

the division of economics dealing with particular aspects of an economy, as the price-cost relationship of a business. Cf. macroeconomies. — microeconomist, n. — microeconomic, adj.
See also: Economics

microeconomics

A branch of economics dealing with the study of units within the economy, e.g. firms, markets, and individual consumers.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.microeconomics - the branch of economics that studies the economy of consumers or households or individual firmsmicroeconomics - the branch of economics that studies the economy of consumers or households or individual firms
economic science, economics, political economy - the branch of social science that deals with the production and distribution and consumption of goods and services and their management
Translations

microeconomics

[ˈmaɪkrəʊˌiːkəˈnɒmɪks] NSINGmicroeconomía f

microeconomics

[ˌmaɪkrəˌiːkəˈnɒmɪks] nmicroéconomie f, micro-économie f

microeconomics

[ˌmaɪkrəʊˌiːkəˈnɒmɪks] nsgmicroeconomia
References in periodicals archive ?
The early literature was mostly focused on price theory, explaining difference between pricing in multi-sided markets and one-sided markets by emphasizing the need to coordinate users and bring all sides on board.
Recognising the central role of price theory in mainstream economics, attention then turns to the different perspective offered by post-Keynesians on the determination and role of prices in the economy.
The essence of Austrian economics is not the market process, but rather price theory and its applications.
136) Although price theory suggests that even a monopolist in the tying-goods market cannot profitably charge a double markup (137) by using tie-ins to achieve monopoly in an otherwise-competitive tied market, this outcome necessarily holds true only for fixed-proportions tying.
It served as the foundation for the price theory revolution and also served as a basic introduction to the ideas of supply, demand and distribution as well as an analysis of the price mechanism in market organization.
Ogden Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago, where he directs the Becker Center on Chicago Price Theory.
He finds that the formation of these bubbles, such as the bubble in house prices and stock values that was so critical in the 2008 financial crisis and its aftermath, does not conform to standard asset price theory and explores alternative explanations that are not dependent on traditional assumptions of rational behavior.
This is a reproduction of a classic text in economic analysis and price theory by Frank Hyneman Knight, one of the founders of the Chicago School.
Before joining the Chicago Booth faculty, he was the inaugural Becker Fellow at the Becker Center on Chicago Price Theory.
This habit, it will be shown, originated in neoclassical price theory, which two schools of antitrust thought ordinarily viewed as antagonists--Harvard and Chicago--embraced as a methodology for understanding how such agreements are formed.
In this chapter, Lee develops a most interesting discussion of price theory and marginalism at Oxford during MacGregor's tenure, concluding perhaps somewhat controversially that Hall and Hitch's kinked demand curve was a marginalist response and explanation of why businessmen do not use marginalist analysis when determining prices (p.
The Economic Institutions of Consumer Law: Price Theory and