microeconomics

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mi·cro·ec·o·nom·ics

 (mī′krō-ĕk′ə-nŏm′ĭks, -ēk′ə-)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of how businesses, households, and individuals within an economy allocate limited resources.

mi′cro·ec′o·nom′ic adj.

microeconomics

(ˌmaɪkrəʊˌiːkəˈnɒmɪks; -ˌɛkə-)
n
(Economics) (functioning as singular) the branch of economics concerned with particular commodities, firms, or individuals and the economic relationships between them. Compare macroeconomics
ˌmicroˌecoˈnomic adj

mi•cro•ec•o•nom•ics

(ˌmaɪ kroʊˌɛk əˈnɒm ɪks, -ˌi kə-)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the branch of economics dealing with particular aspects of an economy, as the price-cost relationship of a firm. Compare macroeconomics.
[1945–50]
mi`cro•ec`o•nom′ic, adj.

microeconomics

the division of economics dealing with particular aspects of an economy, as the price-cost relationship of a business. Cf. macroeconomies. — microeconomist, n. — microeconomic, adj.
See also: Economics

microeconomics

A branch of economics dealing with the study of units within the economy, e.g. firms, markets, and individual consumers.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.microeconomics - the branch of economics that studies the economy of consumers or households or individual firmsmicroeconomics - the branch of economics that studies the economy of consumers or households or individual firms
economic science, economics, political economy - the branch of social science that deals with the production and distribution and consumption of goods and services and their management
Translations

microeconomics

[ˈmaɪkrəʊˌiːkəˈnɒmɪks] NSINGmicroeconomía f

microeconomics

[ˌmaɪkrəˌiːkəˈnɒmɪks] nmicroéconomie f, micro-économie f

microeconomics

[ˌmaɪkrəʊˌiːkəˈnɒmɪks] nsgmicroeconomia
References in periodicals archive ?
However, they no longer learn price theory, which analyzes the critical role that relative prices play in guiding human decision making and the necessary adjustments on multiple margins that are required for adapting to changing circumstances.
In Chicago parlance, the term for macroeconomics is Money; the term for microeconomics is Price Theory.
Although the present paper does not insist in this direction, there are various studies which show also the inconsistency of monopoly price theory.
There doesn't seem to be much in Greening of Capitalism that good old-fashioned price theory can't handle.
Aside from citing Fetter on time preference, which Rothbard planned to elaborate upon in a later chapter, and citing Mises and others on monopoly price theory, for the bulk of the chapter Rothbard mainly utilizes the standard tools of price theory, in particular relying on Stigler (1947 [1946]) and Weiler (1952).
The early literature was mostly focused on price theory, explaining difference between pricing in multi-sided markets and one-sided markets by emphasizing the need to coordinate users and bring all sides on board.
The limit price theory developed by Bain-Sylos Labini-Modigliani at the end of the fifties in the past century allows to demonstrate when a market is not working in a fair way; at the same time, this economic proposal respect the traditional economic theory.
Recognising the central role of price theory in mainstream economics, attention then turns to the different perspective offered by post-Keynesians on the determination and role of prices in the economy.
Further, we note lacunae that remain in the modern analysis of oligopoly and price theory that can be addressed by adopting ideas proposed by Rothschild in his 1947 article and in his later writings.
Today's standard account relies on neoclassical models of price theory and on game theory to provide answers in these settings.
Post-Chicago school analysis just expands conduct based on price theory to include some predatory conduct.
It served as the foundation for the price theory revolution and also served as a basic introduction to the ideas of supply, demand and distribution as well as an analysis of the price mechanism in market organization.