Primitive Methodism

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Primitive Methodism

the practices of the Primitive Methodist Church whose doctrines emphasize Wesleyanism and greater congregational participation in its government. — Primitive Methodist, n.
See also: Protestantism
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We belonged to the congregation of the Primitive Methodists.
But this is certain, he began with the Royal Family, the Primitive Methodists, and the price of fish; and he got from that
During the course of the 19th century it split into several different factions, including Wesleyans, Primitive Methodists and the Methodist New Connexion, also known as Kilhamite Methodists after its founder Alexander Kilham (1762-1798).
April 11, 1915: The Primitive Methodists of Honley had opened a new schoolroom but were finding it costly to run so organised a fundraising bazaar.
Undaunted, Bourne and his followers were joined in 1811 by William Clowes (1780-1851) a potter from Burslem, calling themselves Primitive Methodists.
Their next step was to open a school and this took place on July 1, 1872, at a public ceremony in the school room, which was a new church hall leased from the Primitive Methodists on the corner of Equitable Street and Blenkinsop Street.
The Primitive Methodists sent four missionaries to the Bahamas during the 1790s at the behest of Joseph Paul and "Old Mrs.
The Prims - a nickname stemming from being originally founded as Walsall Wood Ebenezer Primitive Methodists in around 1919 - are chasing a little piece of history today.
In 1882 the Primitive Methodists opened a boarding school, one of only two in the country, for the education of the sons of Primitive Methodists.
As he looks back, he remembers the distress and loneliness that he felt at having been severely judged and then ostracized by the Primitive Methodists, who suspect the worst of him and in their fanaticism alienate him forever from organized religion.
The first dedicated building for worship, built in 1816, was at the bottom of Green Road and housed the congregation until division later in the century between the Primitive Methodists, who built their own chapel further up the road.
Mainly miners, weavers and farmers, they responded to the teaching of the Primitive Methodists whose travelling preachers journeyed throughout the country, offering a message of hope, in particular to impoverished rural communities.