primula

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Related to Primulas: polyanthus

prim·u·la

 (prĭm′yə-lə)
n.

[Short for Medieval Latin prīmula vēris, cowslip, primrose (literally, "little first one of spring") : Latin prīmula, little first one (from feminine of prīmulus, diminutive of prīmus, first; see prime) + Latin vēris, genitive of vēr, spring.]

primula

(ˈprɪmjʊlə)
n
(Plants) any primulaceous plant of the N temperate genus Primula, having white, yellow, pink, or purple funnel-shaped flowers with five spreading petals: includes the primrose, oxlip, cowslip, and polyanthus
[C18: New Latin, from Medieval Latin prīmula (vēris) little first one (of the spring)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.primula - any of numerous short-stemmed plants of the genus Primula having tufted basal leaves and showy flowers clustered in umbels or headsprimula - any of numerous short-stemmed plants of the genus Primula having tufted basal leaves and showy flowers clustered in umbels or heads
genus Primula - very large and important genus of plants of temperate Europe and Asia having showy flowers
English primrose, Primula vulgaris - plant of western and southern Europe widely cultivated for its pale yellow flowers
cowslip, Primula veris, paigle - early spring flower common in British isles having fragrant yellow or sometimes purple flowers
oxlip, paigle, Primula elatior - Eurasian primrose with yellow flowers clustered in a one-sided umbel
Chinese primrose, Primula sinensis - cultivated Asiatic primrose
auricula, bear's ear, Primula auricula - yellow-flowered primrose native to Alps; commonly cultivated
polyanthus, Primula polyantha - florists' primroses; considered a complex hybrid derived from oxlip, cowslip, and common primrose
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
Translations

primula

[ˈprɪmjʊlə] N (Bot) → prímula f

primula

[ˈprɪmjʊlə] n (= flower) → primevère f

primula

nPrimel f

primula

[ˈprɪmjʊlə] n (Bot) → primula
References in classic literature ?
A gilt bamboo jardiniere, in which the primulas and cinerarias were punctually renewed, blocked the access to the bay window (where the old- fashioned would have preferred a bronze reduction of the Venus of Milo); the sofas and arm-chairs of pale brocade were cleverly grouped about little plush tables densely covered with silver toys, porcelain animals and efflorescent photograph frames; and tall rosy-shaded lamps shot up like tropical flowers among the palms.
We once visited a famous nursery in Norfolk where they were struggling to grow candelabra primulas under permanent irrigation.
One of the easiest primulas to grow, Primula denticulata bears ball-shaped clusters of flowers in pink, white or purple.
Primulas are divided into three groups: candelabra, producing rings of flowers all the way up the stem that look great at the edge of a pond or in a shady glade; auricula, evergreen types that have been highly bred and have fantastic markings; and polyanthus, the most familiar group, which includes primroses and cowslips.
Primula allionii is one of my favourite alpine primulas.
QI saw some candelabra primulas in a garden and I thought they looked stunning.
Generally, primulas do best in partial shade and soil rich in humus.
Scotland's cool, moist air suits primulas down to the ground.
It has been used to parent a truly astonishing range of polyanthus and primulas whose production has become a multi-million pound industry.
ONE of the easiest primulas to grow, Primula denticulata bears ball-shaped clusters of flow-w ers in pink, white or purple on thick stems up to 18in tall before the new leaves develop.
Raymond Shaw, York PRIMULAS, snowdrops, scillas and fritillaries will give you spring interest and in summer you can grow favourites such as hostas, ligularias, lysimachia and thalictrum.
A ADRIENNE SAYS: Autumn is a good time to make a wildflower lawn and the simplest way is to put in "plug" plants of mini wildflowers such as cowslips and primulas.