Prince Rupert's drop


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Prince Rupert's drop

n
1. a glass bead in the shape of a teardrop, a by-product of the glass-making process, formed by molten glass falling into water. The body of the drop can withstand great force, for example a hammer blow, but the whole will explode if the tail is nipped or the surface scored
2. (General Physics) a glass bead in the shape of a teardrop, a by-product of the glass-making process, formed by molten glass falling into water. The body of the drop can withstand great force, for example a hammer blow, but the whole will explode if the tail is nipped or the surface scored
[C17: thought to have been introduced to England by Prince Rupert, the German-born nephew of Charles I of England]
References in periodicals archive ?
One open question, however, is how the stresses are distributed throughout a Prince Rupert's drop.
In the new study published in Applied Physics Letters, Aben, Chandrasekar, Chaudhri, and their coauthors have investigated the stress distribution in Prince Rupert's drops using a transmission polariscope, which is a type of microscope that measures the birefringence in an axi-symmetrical transparent object, such as a Prince Rupert's drop.
In their experiments, the researchers suspended a Prince Rupert's drop in a clear liquid, and then illuminated the drop with a red LED.
Prince Rupert's drops are easily made by dropping red hot blobs of molten glass into water.
Aben specializes in determining residual stresses in transparent three-dimensional objects, such as Prince Rupert's drops.
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