conservation of energy

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Related to Principle of conservation of energy: Principle of conservation of momentum

conservation of energy

n.
A principle stating that the total energy of an isolated system remains constant regardless of changes within the system.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

conservation of energy

n
(General Physics) the principle that the total energy of any isolated system is constant and independent of any changes occurring within the system
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

conserva′tion of en′ergy


n.
the principle that in a system not subject to any external force, the amount of energy is constant despite its changes in form.
[1850–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conservation of energy - the fundamental principle of physics that the total energy of an isolated system is constant despite internal changes
law of thermodynamics - (physics) a law governing the relations between states of energy in a closed system
conservation - (physics) the maintenance of a certain quantities unchanged during chemical reactions or physical transformations
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References in periodicals archive ?
To apply the principle of conservation of energy directly is as follows.
The wind turbines work on the principle of conservation of energy through which the wind energy is converted into electrical energy.
Within the physical domain, the principle of conservation of energy generalized the Newtonian program, because it reduced phenomena to local accidental variations of a globally invariant sum of forces.

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