prion

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Related to Prion protein: Prion disease

pri·on

(prī′ŏn′, prē′-)
n.
A protein particle that is the agent of infection in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including bovine spongiform encephalopathy, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and scrapie. Prions are the only known infectious agents that do not contain DNA or RNA. They derive from a normal body protein that becomes irreversibly misfolded, and they proliferate in the body, possibly by acting as a template for further protein misfolding.

[Alteration of pro(teinaceous) in(fectious particle).]

prion

(ˈpraɪən)
n
(Animals) any of various dovelike petrels of the genus Pachyptila of the southern oceans that have a serrated bill
[C19: New Latin, from Greek priōn a saw]

prion

(ˈpriːɒn)
n
(Microbiology) a protein in the brain, an abnormal form of which is thought to be the transmissible agent responsible for certain spongiform encephalopathies, such as BSE, scrapie, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and kuru
[C20: altered from pro(teinaceous) in(fectious particle)]

pri•on

(ˈpri ɒn, ˈpraɪ-)

n.
a tiny proteinaceous particle, likened to viruses and viroids, but having no genetic component, thought to be an infectious agent in bovine spongiform encephalopathy, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and similar encephalopathies.
[1980–85; pr (oteinaceous) + i (nfectious) + -on1]

pri·on

(prē′ŏn)
A particle composed of protein, similar to a virus but lacking DNA or RNA. Prions are thought to be the agent of infection of some diseases of the nervous system.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prion - (microbiology) an infectious protein particle similar to a virus but lacking nucleic acid; thought to be the agent responsible for scrapie and other degenerative diseases of the nervous system
microbiology - the branch of biology that studies microorganisms and their effects on humans
subatomic particle, particle - a body having finite mass and internal structure but negligible dimensions
Translations
prioni
プリオン
프리온

prion

nPrion nt; prion proteinPrion-Protein nt

prion

n prion or prión m
References in periodicals archive ?
Prion diseases originate when normally harmless prion protein molecules become abnormal and gather in clusters and filaments in the human body and brain.
Retrospective studies of the prevalence of subclinical vCJD infection using appendectomy and tonsillectomy specimens in the United Kingdom described 6 appendixes that were positive for disease-associated prion protein in Val/ValP9 persons (23-25).
PrPC is normally present in the nervous system of healthy individuals and is absent in Creutzfeldt-Jakob prion disease patients who have a pathological form of prion protein called scrapie prion protein (PrPSc).
C], we have infected wild type prion protein gene ([Prnp.
The Prnp gene itself consists of two exons and an open reading frame that encodes for the 253-amino-acid-long prion protein known as PrP.
There are now known to be a number of specific genetic mutations within the prion protein which determines both the length of the disease and which conditions are prominent.
Rogue prion proteins are believed to be the infective agents behind the disease.
Towards that end, ARS Pullman geneticist Stephen White is leading a team of ARS and university scientists to characterize the prion protein gene of goats and identify important gene variants in individuals and breeds.
But scientists from the Medical Research Council stopped the spread of disease by genetically switching off production of normal prion protein.
The majority of cases are sporadic, but some cases are familial carrying a prion protein mutation.
Prion protein is a natural cellular protein that can become misfolded into infectious particles and cause bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, or "mad cow disease") and a lethal variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans.
Researchers examined 11 recent cases of kuru, a prion protein disease that became an epidemic in the mid-1900s among several groups of Papua New Guinea natives, resulting from their ritual cannibalism, reported John Collinge, Ph.