Priscillianism

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Priscillianism

the concepts of Priscillian, 4th-century bishop of Avila, exe-cuted for heresies influenced by Manichaeism, Docetism, and modalism. — Priscillianist, n., adj.
See also: Heresy
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[...] Among the opponents of the Resurrection we naturally find first those who denied the immortality of the soul; secondly, all those who, like Plato, regarded the body as the prison of the soul and death as an escape from the bondage of matter; thirdly the sects of the Gnostics and Manichaeans who looked upon all matter as evil; fourthly, the followers of these latter sects the Priscillianists, the Cathari, and the Albigenses; fifthly, the Rationalists, Materialists, and Pantheists of later times.
examines how a number of heretics and heresies mentioned by Jerome in his letter to Ctesiphon (including Simon Magus, though he is not the focus of this chapter) lived on in the Pelagians and the Priscillianists. Again, in chapter 7, he examines Vincent of Lerins's association of Simon with Priscillian, offering a descriptive account but little comparison of Vincent with Jerome (other than that the former was more forthcoming than the latter [127]), without addressing the obvious question of Vincent's degree of dependence on Jerome.
This subject can be approached from the point of view of "real women"--women who were tortured and executed--as well as from that of "women-as-code." Women accused of "heresy" in early and medieval Christianity include those labeled "Gnostics," Montanists, Priscillianists, Origenists,(90) Cathars,(91) and Beguines.(92) Studies of the witch craze now fill volumes, since Hugh Trevor-Roper's pioneering work of 1967 (in which, it must be noted, "women" are not the issue at [or on the] stake).(93)
A whole set of later groups were probably its offshoots: Quintillianists from a prophetess of the third century; Pepuzites, Priscillianists (of Priscilla, not Priscillian), apparent oddities like the Artotyrites and Tascodrougites, and the Tertullianists of Augustine's day, who were the true Montanists of North Africa.