prize fighting


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Translations

prize fighting

npugilato professionistico
References in classic literature ?
Just at this time the mayor was boasting that he had put an end to gambling and prize fighting in the city; but here a swarm of professional gamblers had leagued themselves with the police to fleece the strikebreakers; and any night, in the big open space in front of Brown's, one might see brawny Negroes stripped to the waist and pounding each other for money, while a howling throng of three or four thousand surged about, men and women, young white girls from the country rubbing elbows with big buck Negroes with daggers in their boots, while rows of woolly heads peered down from every window of the surrounding factories.
The stoppage improves Taylor's KO rate to 67% after 32 rounds of prize fighting since her first paid outing last November.
1860: A boxing match often considered to be the first world title fight - even though prize fighting was illegal at the time - took place near Farnborough, Hants, when Tom Sayers took on American John Heenan.
It's about prize fighting so I want him to win all the belts and then fight me.
CONSIDERING THE IMMENSE prejudices of those who give the cue, we do not so much wonder at the aversion which most of the intellectual and benevolent members of the community feel toward Prize Fighting as an "institution," and which has been called forth quite loudly and generally by the late contest between Morrissey and Heenan.
Each winner received a prize fighting bell plaque and a $5,000 check for a charity of its choice.
An Act punishing prize fighting and sparring or boxing exhibitions.
BOXING fans can mingle with a whole host of well-known names from the world of North-east prize fighting and beyond at Saturday's sportsman's evening in East Cleveland with Hartlepool boxing icon Michael Hunter.
Stalker says his situation is a sobering reminder to any young boxer turning professional and thinking prize fighting is all showbiz and lights.
Some believe that the tunnels and rooms served as venues for illegal gambling and prize fighting, which for a time was prohibited.