pro-choice

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Related to Pro-choice movement: Abortion rights

pro-choice

(prō-chois′)
adj.
Favoring legalized abortion as an option for an unwanted pregnancy.

pro-choic′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pro-choice

adj
(Sociology) (of an organization, pressure group, etc) supporting the right of a woman to have an abortion. Compare pro-life
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pro-choice

or pro•choice

(proʊˈtʃɔɪs)

adj.
supporting or advocating the right to legalized abortion. Compare pro-life.
[1970–75]
pro-choic′er, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pro-choice - advocating a woman's right to control her own body (especially her right to an induced abortion)
pro-life - advocating full legal protection of embryos and fetuses (especially opposing the legalization of induced abortions)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

pro-choice

[ˌprəʊˈtʃɔɪs] ADJen favor de la libertad de elección
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pro-choice

adj group, organizationfür Abtreibung pred; pro-choice movementBewegung fder Abtreibungsbefürworter
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

pro-choice

[ˈprəʊˈtʃɔɪs] adjper la libertà di scelta di gravidanza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

pro-choice

adj pro-elección, a favor de la legalización del aborto voluntario
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
All of this changed when Republicans such as Ronald Reagan actively embraced the pro-life movement, and when Democrats such as Walter Mondale actively embraced the pro-choice movement. A proposed anti-abortion amendment to the Constitution proved particularly divisive.
Green is the signature colour of the pro-choice movement in Argentina.
The student had heard the pro-choice movement's slogans.
Sarah Ewart became the public face of the pro-choice movement after she made the heartbreaking decision to terminate her unborn child.
(46) Though Manian specifically describes the pro-choice movement's efforts to dismantle personhood legislation, the fact that a pro-life organization such as the SBA is distancing itself, if not indirectly undermining, those legislative efforts illustrates yet another example of the pro-life destigmatization efforts.
The first half traces the development of a distinctly Catholic pro-choice movement. It tells the story of the first Catholic women to publicly challenge the hierarchy on the practice of birth control and abortion in an era when it was widely assumed that all Catholics believed what the magisterium told them to believe.
"In the pro-choice movement, we advocate using logic, reason and the strong values of our issue rather than glitter."
Only by reclaiming abortion as a fundamental right and normal part of health care can the pro-choice movement hope to win in the long run.
"Critical events and the mobilization of the pro-choice movement." Research in Political Sociology, 6, 319-345.
In this chapter, Buchanan points to the fluidity of maternal constructs and instructs the pro-choice movement to revisit the "one-person construct of pregnancy" (p.
After a long period of stagnant rhetoric from both sides of the debate, HMJT offers the pro-choice movement an opportunity to radically reframe the question of legal restrictions on abortion.
As I was regaling her with stories about the history of the pro-choice movement, the harassment bordering on bullying of clinic doctors and patients at the hands of anti-choice extremists, and Morgentaler's persistence through it all, she just waved me away.