probate

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Related to Probate law: probate will, Probate estate

pro·bate

 (prō′bāt′)
n.
1. The legal process by which the validity of a will is established.
2. Judicial certification of the validity of a will.
tr.v. pro·bat·ed, pro·bat·ing, pro·bates
To establish the validity of (a will) by probate.
adj.
Of or relating to probate or to a probate court: probate law; a probate judge.

[Middle English probat, from Latin probātum, neuter past participle of probāre, to prove; see prove.]

probate

(ˈprəʊbɪt; -beɪt)
n
1. (Law) the act or process of officially proving the authenticity and validity of a will
2. (Law)
a. the official certificate stating a will to be genuine and conferring on the executors power to administer the estate
b. the probate copy of a will
3. (Law) (in the US) all matters within the jurisdiction of a probate court
4. (Law) (modifier) of, relating to, or concerned with probate: probate value; a probate court.
vb
(Law) (tr) chiefly US and Canadian to establish officially the authenticity and validity of (a will)
[C15: from Latin probāre to inspect]

pro•bate

(ˈproʊ beɪt)

n., adj., v. -bat•ed, -bat•ing. n.
1. the official proving of a will as authentic or valid in a probate court.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to probate or a probate court.
v.t.
3. to establish the authenticity or validity of (a will).
[1400–50; late Middle English probat < Latin probātum, n. use of neuter past participle of probāre to examine, prove; see -ate1]

probate

- The official proving of a will, from Latin probatum, "thing proved."
See also related terms for official.

probate


Past participle: probated
Gerund: probating

Imperative
probate
probate
Present
I probate
you probate
he/she/it probates
we probate
you probate
they probate
Preterite
I probated
you probated
he/she/it probated
we probated
you probated
they probated
Present Continuous
I am probating
you are probating
he/she/it is probating
we are probating
you are probating
they are probating
Present Perfect
I have probated
you have probated
he/she/it has probated
we have probated
you have probated
they have probated
Past Continuous
I was probating
you were probating
he/she/it was probating
we were probating
you were probating
they were probating
Past Perfect
I had probated
you had probated
he/she/it had probated
we had probated
you had probated
they had probated
Future
I will probate
you will probate
he/she/it will probate
we will probate
you will probate
they will probate
Future Perfect
I will have probated
you will have probated
he/she/it will have probated
we will have probated
you will have probated
they will have probated
Future Continuous
I will be probating
you will be probating
he/she/it will be probating
we will be probating
you will be probating
they will be probating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been probating
you have been probating
he/she/it has been probating
we have been probating
you have been probating
they have been probating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been probating
you will have been probating
he/she/it will have been probating
we will have been probating
you will have been probating
they will have been probating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been probating
you had been probating
he/she/it had been probating
we had been probating
you had been probating
they had been probating
Conditional
I would probate
you would probate
he/she/it would probate
we would probate
you would probate
they would probate
Past Conditional
I would have probated
you would have probated
he/she/it would have probated
we would have probated
you would have probated
they would have probated

probate

The process of legally establishing the validity of a person’s will.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.probate - a judicial certificate saying that a will is genuine and conferring on the executors the power to administer the estate
certificate, credential, credentials, certification - a document attesting to the truth of certain stated facts
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
2.probate - the act of proving that an instrument purporting to be a will was signed and executed in accord with legal requirements
validation, substantiation, proof - the act of validating; finding or testing the truth of something
Verb1.probate - put a convicted person on probation by suspending his sentence
postpone, prorogue, put off, defer, set back, shelve, table, put over, remit, hold over - hold back to a later time; "let's postpone the exam"
2.probate - establish the legal validity of (wills and other documents)
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
validate, formalise, formalize - declare or make legally valid
Translations

probate

[ˈprəʊbɪt]
A. N (Jur) → validación f de un testamento, validación f testamentaria
to value sth for probateevaluar algo para la validación testamentaria
B. CPD probate court Ntribunal m de testamentarías

probate

[ˈprəʊbeɪt] nvalidation f, homologation f

probate

n (= examination)gerichtliche Testamentsbestätigung; (= will)beglaubigte Testamentsabschrift; grant of probateErbscheinerteilung f

probate

[ˈprəʊbɪt] n (Law) → omologazione f (di un testamento)
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