probation

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pro·ba·tion

 (prō-bā′shən)
n.
1. A process or period in which a person's fitness, as for work or membership in a social group, is tested.
2. Law
a. A criminal sentence consisting of a term of imprisonment that is suspended provided certain terms and conditions are met.
b. The status of serving such a criminal sentence.
3. Release of a person from commitment for insanity, subject to reversal in the event of a relapse into insanity.
4. A trial period in which a student is given time to try to redeem failing grades or bad conduct.

[Middle English probacion, a testing, from Old French probation, from Latin probātiō, probātiōn-, from probātus, past participle of probāre, to test; see prove.]

pro·ba′tion·al adj.
pro·ba′tion·al·ly adv.
pro·ba′tion·ar′y adj.

probation

(prəˈbeɪʃən)
n
1. (Law) a system of dealing with offenders by placing them under the supervision of a probation officer
2. (Law) on probation
a. under the supervision of a probation officer
b. undergoing a test period
3. a trial period, as for a teacher, religious novitiate, etc
4. the act of proving or testing
5. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a period during which a new employee may have his employment terminated on the grounds of unsuitability
proˈbational, proˈbationary adj
proˈbationally adv

pro•ba•tion

(proʊˈbeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the testing or trial of a person's conduct, character, qualifications, or the like.
2. the state or period of such testing or trial.
3. the conditional release of an offender under the supervision of a probation officer.
4. the trial period or condition of a student who is being permitted to redeem failures, misconduct, etc.
5. the act of testing.
6. Archaic. proof.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin probātiō approval, proof. See prove, -tion]
pro•ba′tion•al, pro•ba′tion•ar′y, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.probation - a trial period during which your character and abilities are tested to see whether you are suitable for work or for membership
test period, trial period - a period of time during which someone or something is tested
2.probation - a trial period during which an offender has time to redeem himself or herself
test period, trial period - a period of time during which someone or something is tested
3.probation - (law) a way of dealing with offenders without imprisoning them; a defendant found guilty of a crime is released by the court without imprisonment subject to conditions imposed by the court; "probation is part of the sentencing process"
freeing, liberation, release - the act of liberating someone or something
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"

probation

noun trial period, test, trial, examination, apprenticeship, initiation, novitiate The appointment will be subject to a six-month term of probation.
Translations
فَتْرَة إخْتِبار المُوَظَّف الجَديدمُراقَبَة المَحْكوم عليْه
podmíněné propuštěnízkušební lhůta
prøveløsladelseprøvetid
feltételes szabadlábra helyezéspróbaidő
reynslutímiskilorîsdómur
bandomasis laikasbūti lygtinai paleistamlygtinai paleistilygtinis nuteisimasstažuotis
nosacīta atbrīvošanapārbaudes laiks
podmienečné prepustenieskúšobná lehota

probation

[prəˈbeɪʃən]
A. N (Jur) → libertad f condicional
to be on probationestar en libertad condicional; (in employment) → estar a prueba
to put sb on probationponer a algn en libertad provisional (fig) → asignar a algn un período a prueba
to take sth on probation (= as a trial) → tomar algo a prueba
release on probationlibertad f a prueba
B. CPD probation officer N funcionario que vigila a las personas que están en libertad condicional

probation

[prəˈbeɪʃən] n
(LAW)liberté f surveillée
to put sb on probation [+ offender] → mettre qn en liberté surveillée
to be given two years' probation [offender] → être condamné(e) à deux ans de liberté surveillée
to be on probation [offender] → être en liberté surveillée probation order, probation service
(in employment) (= period) → période f d'essai
on probation [employee] → à l'essai
(RELIGION)noviciat m, probation f

probation

n
(Jur) → Bewährung f; to put somebody on probation (for a year)jdm (ein Jahr) Bewährung geben; to be on probationauf Bewährung sein, Bewährung haben
(of employee)Probe f; (= probation period)Probezeit f; (Rel) → Noviziat nt

probation

[prəˈbeɪʃn] n to be on probation (Law) → essere in libertà vigilata; (gen, in employment) → essere in prova, fare un periodo di prova
to put sb on probation (Law) → sottoporre qn a libertà vigilata

probation

(prəˈbeiʃən) , ((American) prou-) noun
1. the system allowing people who have broken the law to go free on condition that they commit no more crimes and report regularly to a social worker.
2. (in certain jobs) a period of time during which a person is carefully watched to see that he is capable of the job.
proˈbationary adjective
probation officer noun
be/put on probation
to (cause to) undergo a period of probation.
References in classic literature ?
We discover the latter in changed conditions; instead of a bride with boxes and trunks which others bore, we see her a lonely woman with a basket and a bundle in her own porterage, as at an earlier time when she was no bride; instead of the ample means that were projected by her husband for her comfort through this probationary period, she can produce only a flattened purse.
Durham MP Kevan Jones is worried policing is becoming a graduate profession and also voiced concerns about its planned longer probationary period.
Just eliminate the six-month probationary period and require payment of contribution to all benefits from Day 1.
If the author does fairly well during the trial period, Loveforce exercises an option to permanently publish the material released during the probationary period and signs the author for an extended period of time and/or for additional works.
"Recruitment can be very expensive and there's never any guarantee that you've chosen the right candidate, so it makes sense to employ new recruits on an initial probationary period until you're sure.
Upon clearance from this stage, a teacher is then hired on a probationary period. After clearing all these stages, one bags the job of a teacher.
The unnamed worker took up his post in January at the Kenmare, Co Kerry, site but was fired by John Brennan during his probationary period.
The most common ground is the release of employees is the mutual consent, 87 people left their positions, 52 are retired employees and 12 are dismissed due to expiration of their probationary period.
FIBA also placed the country under a probationary period of three years, meaning that the Philippines could have another closed-door affair if the incident similar to the one in Bocaue happens for the second time.
From 1 January 2019, the probationary period will be reduced for holders of a first driver's license who have followed additional "post-license" training.
Under Code 19.2-306, the circuit court had jurisdiction to hear the case against the appellant when it revoked her "indefinite" probation and ordered her to serve 90 days of her previously suspended sentence.<br />Background<br />Appellant Dorothy Cilwa was convicted of grand larceny on March 19, 2008, and received a suspended sentence conditioned on one year of supervised probation.<br />On August 14, 2008, the circuit court ruled that Cilwa had violated that probation based on her conviction for a new offense and ordered her probationary period to be extended another year, to August 14, 2009.<br />On June 7, 2009, Cilwa was arrested for a new grand larceny offense.
1956, Chapter 4 of Title 36).<br />Crenshaw had been an officer on the Southborough police force after graduating from the Massachusetts Police Academy.<br />The CBA then in effect between the college and the CCRI Educational Support Professional Association provided for a mandatory 130-day probationary period for new hires.