Procopius


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Related to Procopius: Justinian

Pro·co·pi·us

 (prə-kō′pē-əs) fl. sixth century ad.
Byzantine historian during the reign of Justinian I. He wrote histories of the Persian, Vandal, and Gothic wars and Anecdota, an attack on Justinian.

Procopius

(prəʊˈkəʊpɪəs)
n
(Biography) ?490–?562 ad, Byzantine historian, noted for his account of the wars of Justinian I against the Persians, Vandals, and Ostrogoths
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
When the Huns lured the king into the great pit, he flung it away-- Procopius tells the story--nor was it ever found again, though the Emperor Anastasius offered five hundred-weight of gold pieces for it.
In the sixth Christian century lived Procopius, a Christian magistrate of Constantinople, in the days when Justinian was Emperor and Belisarius general.
Procopius of Varna".,,The money for the construction of Hemus is fully insured and is on a separate account'', said Borissov.
Procopius Abbey in Lisle has been accused of sexually abusing a Benet Academy student roughly 40 years ago, according to abbey officials.
There was a further rebellion from 491-518 ad under the emperor Anastasius I and Mount Gerizim was re-occupied, and then reconquered by Procopius, the governor of Edessa.
Procopius Parish in Pilsen, Chicago, in summer 2017.
They also visited the Grand Park of Tirana, where visitors can see an artificial lake and other landmarks including the Saint Procopius Church and the Presidential Palace, he added.
The area of their settlement is located by Jordanes between the rivers Dniester and Dnieper (2), while Procopius states on the one hand that the Antes lived north of the Utigurs (who were settled above the See of Azov) and on the other hand that the Antes, along with the Sclaveni, had settled "on the northern bank of the Danube" (3).
Thus, they are, as for Procopius, simultaneously both a panegyric and a description (Elsner 35), yet using the tangible quality of the image of the building to conceptualise the nature of man's struggle for right and wrong, or his relationship with his God.
Jerome, Epistole 73:7; Procopius of Gaza, Comentariu la Facere, in PG 87:333; St.
As the Editor in Chief observes in her Preface (vii), it was a fortunate result of chance that the main articles deal with historians, on the one hand, the Hellenistic authors Polybius and Diodorus Siculus, and on the other, from late-antiquity, Zosimus Historicus, Procopius of Caesarea, and the fictitious Dares Phrygius, the latter once believed to be primus fere historicorum.