Procrustes


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Procrustes

(prəʊˈkrʌstiːz)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a robber, who put travellers in his bed, stretching or lopping off their limbs so that they fitted it
[C16: from Greek Prokroustēs the stretcher, from prokrouein to extend by hammering out]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Pro•crus•tes

(proʊˈkrʌs tiz)

n.
(in Greek myth) a robber who stretched or amputated the limbs of travelers to make them conform to the length of his bed.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Procrustes - (Greek mythology) a mythical giant who was a thief and murderer; he would capture people and tie them to an iron bed, stretching them or hacking off their legs to make them fit; was killed by Theseus
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Procrustes

[prəʊˈkrʌstiːz] NProcusto
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
One of these bad people was named Procrustes; and he was indeed a terrible fellow, and had an ugly way of making fun of the poor travelers who happened to fall into his clutches.
We performed Procrustes analyses to obtain shape (weighted matrix) and size variables (centroid size) of cranium and jaws with TpsRelw v1.1 (Rohlf, 2008b).
Pair-wise procrustes distances were calculated between group averages using Morphologika2 v2.5 program.
In order to translate, rotate and uniformly scale the specimens relative to each other so as to minimize a total sum of squares, a full Procrustes fit and a projection of the data to the tangent space (Dryden & Mardia, 1998) was conducted.
Procrustes, also known as 'the stretcher', was a Greek robber dwelling in Attica who had a residence on 'the sacred way' between Athens and Eleusis.
Taleb followed that with The Black Swan in 2007 (probably his most famous work), The Bed of Procrustes in 2010, and Antifragile in 2012.
The development of geometric morphometric techniques (Bookstein 1978, 1991, 1996, 1998) has enabled rapid advances in quantifying organismal form (i.e., Generalized Procrustes Superimposition, Rohlf & Marcus 1993) to isolate the effects of morphological changes, independent of potential confounding factors such as size, orientation, and translocation.
The Cartesian coordinates were subjected to Procrustes superimposition, and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and discriminant analysis were performed using MorphoJ software (Klingenberg 2011).
The talk was built around the legendary Greek robber Procrustes, who infamously either stretched his guests or cut part of their legs off to make them fit in his bed.