proditor

proditor

(ˈprɒdɪtə)
n
obsolete a traitor
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
proditor. On the ventral view of the cranium, the first and second PC cumulative variance explained 87%; E.
(26.) quod si stulta negas, index anteacta fatebor, / et veniam culpae proditor ipse meae, / quoque loco tecum fuerim, quotensque, Cypassi, / narrabo dominae, quotque quibusque modis!
vel Sc: the kyngis traytour proditor regis On the other hand, there were instances where the Scots text expanded the Latin construction.
96v), closely paralleling the situation at San Zaccaria and calling the patriarchal vicar in charge of conventual reforms a "proditor," "usito del seme de Iudda," and "artefice diabolico." Similar instances in Florence are reported by Evangelisti.
It reports the penalty for marrying the queen to be forfeiture of goods for life and death as a traitor (in mortis supplicium, tanquam regis proditor), whereas the statute only threatened forfeiture of goods.