product life cycle

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product life cycle

n
(Marketing) marketing the four stages (introduction, growth, maturity, and decline) into one of which the sales of a product fall during its market life
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Koehler's innovative lighting solutions are the best-in-class in sight and reliability and long product life cycles, which are directly linked to safety and lowest cost of ownership."
In Marketing 101 students are introduced to product life cycles. They learn about the stages of the product life cycle: Growth, stability, decline and renewal.
Economists embraced it, manufacturers poured R&D money into it, product life cycles diminished and then fashion came in to make the notion itself obsolete.
Topics discussed include approaches to sustainable user experiences, product life cycles, frameworks for sustainable user experiences, and core usability and balance.
Providing BIM improves sustainability, eliminates waste and improves product life cycles. Miele Professional www.mieleusa.com, 800-991-9380
The unit easily adapts to rapidly changing product life cycles. All product passes through the in-line mixing head.
This variance could be investigated to find ways to reduce the "run-out" costs of SG&A final settlements and closing activities in the final year of product life cycles. There is no membership in Year 16, so there are no corresponding variances for Year 16 shown in Tables 2-5.
Loh predictably finds this "creepy," but she is on solid argumentative ground when she wonders why more conservatives don't share her reaction: "In a capitalist society work dictates the schedules, the deadlines, the urgency; product life cycles supersede family life cycles at every turn.
They deliver innovative and robust clinical development solutions from "first-in-human" studies through market launch and surveillance to help the world's biopharmaceutical companies maximize product life cycles and grow market share.
More products drive the need to determine specific product costs and profitability; market segmentation drives the need to determine specific market costs and profitability; multiple products and more fickle customers result in shorter product life cycles, higher research and development costs and higher advertising and marketing expenses.
Applications include transportation, industrial and renewable energy markets where long product life cycles hinder significant product redesigns.
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