unman

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un·man

 (ŭn-măn′)
tr.v. un·manned, un·man·ning, un·mans
1. To take away characteristics traditionally associated with masculinity, such as courage or strength: "So desolate were those places and so deep the horror that lay on them that some of the host were unmanned, and they could neither walk nor ride further north" (J.R.R. Tolkien).
2. To take away virility from; emasculate: "If Henry tells the world that he is impotent because I have unmanned him, how can I prove differently?" (Philippa Gregory).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

unman

(ʌnˈmæn)
vb (tr) , -mans, -manning or -manned
1. to cause to lose courage or nerve
2. to make effeminate
3. to remove the men from
4. archaic to deprive of human qualities
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

un•man

(ʌnˈmæn)

v.t. -manned, -man•ning.
1. to deprive of courage or fortitude; break down the manly spirit of.
2. to deprive of virility; emasculate; castrate.
[1590–1600]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

unman


Past participle: unmanned
Gerund: unmanning

Imperative
unman
unman
Present
I unman
you unman
he/she/it unmans
we unman
you unman
they unman
Preterite
I unmanned
you unmanned
he/she/it unmanned
we unmanned
you unmanned
they unmanned
Present Continuous
I am unmanning
you are unmanning
he/she/it is unmanning
we are unmanning
you are unmanning
they are unmanning
Present Perfect
I have unmanned
you have unmanned
he/she/it has unmanned
we have unmanned
you have unmanned
they have unmanned
Past Continuous
I was unmanning
you were unmanning
he/she/it was unmanning
we were unmanning
you were unmanning
they were unmanning
Past Perfect
I had unmanned
you had unmanned
he/she/it had unmanned
we had unmanned
you had unmanned
they had unmanned
Future
I will unman
you will unman
he/she/it will unman
we will unman
you will unman
they will unman
Future Perfect
I will have unmanned
you will have unmanned
he/she/it will have unmanned
we will have unmanned
you will have unmanned
they will have unmanned
Future Continuous
I will be unmanning
you will be unmanning
he/she/it will be unmanning
we will be unmanning
you will be unmanning
they will be unmanning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been unmanning
you have been unmanning
he/she/it has been unmanning
we have been unmanning
you have been unmanning
they have been unmanning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been unmanning
you will have been unmanning
he/she/it will have been unmanning
we will have been unmanning
you will have been unmanning
they will have been unmanning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been unmanning
you had been unmanning
he/she/it had been unmanning
we had been unmanning
you had been unmanning
they had been unmanning
Conditional
I would unman
you would unman
he/she/it would unman
we would unman
you would unman
they would unman
Past Conditional
I would have unmanned
you would have unmanned
he/she/it would have unmanned
we would have unmanned
you would have unmanned
they would have unmanned
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.unman - cause to lose one's nerveunman - cause to lose one's nerve; "an unmanning experience"
faze, unnerve, unsettle, enervate - disturb the composure of
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

unman

[ˈʌnˈmæn] VT
1. (liter) → amedrentar (liter), acobardar
2. [+ post etc] → desguarnecer
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

unman

vtschwach werden lassen; (= make lose courage)entmutigen, verzagen lassen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Ransom travels to the planet Venus, where he attempts to save the inhabitants of this Eden-like planet from their own fall from grace and the clutches of the demonic Professor Weston.
Jessica Korney, co-Founder along with Professor Weston stated “There were times when we were so very close, but the real breakthrough for us was the advancement in worldwide communication technology.
In an article for the Royal Institute of British Architects, Professor Weston asks whether Wales is once again to be deprived of "a first-rate modern building" now that steps are seen to be politically incorrect.
The first book bluntly demonstrates the twisted science of Professor Weston, the venial nature of his collaborator and financier, Devine, and the very human fears and concerns of the protagonist, Ransom.
Professor Weston, an expert in modern Nordic architecture who has taught at Cardiff University since 1999, makes the scarves in a studio at his home in the Vale of Glamorgan village of Dinas Powys.