progenitor

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pro·gen·i·tor

 (prō-jĕn′ĭ-tər)
n.
1. A direct ancestor. See Synonyms at ancestor.
2. An originator of a line of descent; a precursor.
3. An originator; a founder: progenitors of the new music.

[Middle English progenitour, from Old French progeniteur, from Latin prōgenitor, from prōgenitus, past participle of prōgignere, to beget : prō-, forward; see pro-1 + gignere, gen-, to beget; see genə- in Indo-European roots.]

progenitor

(prəʊˈdʒɛnɪtə)
n
1. a direct ancestor
2. an originator or founder of a future development; precursor
[C14: from Latin: ancestor, from pro-1 + genitor parent, from gignere to beget]

pro•gen•i•tor

(proʊˈdʒɛn ɪ tər)

n.
1. a biologically related ancestor.
2. a person or thing that originates something or serves as a model; precursor.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin prōgenitor the founder of a family = prō- pro-1 + genitor father, parent (geni-, variant s. of gignere to beget + -tor -tor; c. Greek genétōr, Skt janitar-)]
pro•gen′i•tor•ship`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.progenitor - an ancestor in the direct lineprogenitor - an ancestor in the direct line  
ancestor, antecedent, ascendant, ascendent, root - someone from whom you are descended (but usually more remote than a grandparent)
genitor - a natural father or mother

progenitor

noun
1. ancestor, parent, forebear, forefather, begetter, procreator, primogenitor the Arabian stallions which were the progenitors of all modern thoroughbreds
2. originator, source, predecessor, precursor, forerunner, antecedent, instigator the man who is considered the progenitor of modern drama

progenitor

noun
1. A person from whom one is descended:
Archaic: predecessor.
2. One that precedes, as in time:
Translations

progenitor

[prəʊˈdʒenɪtəʳ] Nprogenitor m

progenitor

[prəʊˈdʒɛnɪtər] n
(= ancestor) → ancêtre m/f
[idea, invention] (= originator) → promoteur/trice m/f

progenitor

n (form)Vorfahr(in) m(f), → Ahn m, → Ahne f; (fig)Vorläufer m

progenitor

[prəʊˈdʒɛnɪtəʳ] n (frm) → progenitore/trice, antenato/a
References in classic literature ?
The reader probably knows, if enough has not already been gleaned form this narrative, that the Delaware, or Lenape, claimed to be the progenitors of that numerous people, who once were masters of most of the eastern and northern states of America, of whom the community of the Mohicans was an ancient and highly honored member.
Yet the taste of the age, demanding whatever was elaborate in compositions of this kind, did not fail to extend its influence over our stern progenitors, who had cast behind them so many fashions which it might seem harder to dispense with.
For though their progenitors, the builders of Babel, must doubtless, by their tower, have intended to rear the loftiest mast-head in all Asia, or Africa either; yet (ere the final truck was put to it) as that great stone mast of theirs may be said to have gone by the board, in the dread gale of God's wrath; therefore, we cannot give these Babel builders priority over the Egyptians.
Our physicians have discovered that the small and tender sides of an infant Polygon of the higher class can be fractured, and his whole frame re-set, with such exactness that a Polygon of two or three hundred sides sometimes -- by no means always, for the process is attended with serious risk -- but sometimes overleaps two or three hundred generations, and as it were doubles at a stroke, the number of his progenitors and the nobility of his descent.
They were the early progenitors of her race, but had mixed with the other great race of early Martians, who were very dark, almost black, and also with the reddish yellow race which had flourished at the same time.
They were pleased and flattered by the words of the strange Tarmangani, who called himself Mangani and spoke the language of the hairy progenitors of man.
This was the Lord de Vere, who, when at home, was said to spend much of his time in the burial vault of his dead progenitors, rummaging their mouldy coffins in search of all the earthly pride and vainglory that was hidden among bones and dust; so that, besides his own share, he had the collected haughtiness of his whole line of ancestry.
And believe me, dear countrymen, whether I live or die, the honor of this great country, and the fame bequeathed us by our heroic progenitors, shall suffer no diminution in my hands.
The earliest accounts I possess of my progenitors represent them as a goodly growth of the Linum Usitatissimum, divided into a thousand cotemporaneous plants, singularly well conditioned, and remarkable for an equality that renders the production valuable.
Fancy might have regarded the act as the recrudescence of a trick in which her armed progenitors were not unpractised.
But she was still an ape, a huge, fierce, terrible beast of a species closely allied to the gorilla, yet more intelligent; which, with the strength of their cousin, made her kind the most fearsome of those awe-inspiring progenitors of man.
The historians of culture are quite consistent in regard to their progenitors, the writers of universal histories, for if historical events may be explained by the fact that certain persons treated one another in such and such ways, why not explain them by the fact that such and such people wrote such and such books?