multifocal

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multifocal

(ˌmʌltɪˈfəʊkəl)
adj
1. (General Physics) having a range of focal lengths
2. (Pathology) (of a disease) affecting more than one part of the body or of an organ
Translations

mul·ti·fo·cal

a. multifocal, rel. a más de un foco.

multifocal

adj multifocal
References in periodicals archive ?
In Italy, monofocal lenses are negative and progressive lenses tend to migrate slightly to cheaper products with consequent decline in value.
Well, the primary thing to note is that not all Progressive Lenses are made equally.
Progressive lenses Lens enhancements aren't the only way to upgrade your vision experience.
In addition, Autograph InTouch offers both a reading area and an intermediate viewing area that are up to 22% broader when compared with other progressive lenses on the market," the company explained to OT.
It also exclusively offers the world's thinnest lenses from Tokai-take note, dahlings, the pioneering 'Lutina lenses that reduce damage and save our eye's lutein, and Shamir's intelligent and freeform progressive lenses.
Progressive lenses are true multifocal lenses in that they provide a seamless progression of many lens powers allowing viewing at all distances.
And now here I was, with two plusses on my prescription, leading out small print into brighter light to better read it, and contemplating technologies totally new to me, such as progressive lenses.
As for lenses, the growth of the European market came from progressive lenses.
Also, progressive lenses come only in lower strengths--they aren't made for people with more severe vision impairments.
Bifocals have separate areas for near and distance vision, and progressive lenses have separate areas for distance, intermediate (looking at a computer screen, for example) and near tasks.
Frames start at $39, single-vision contact lenses at $20 and no-line progressive lenses at $60.
As a teacher educator of color who attempts to ground my teaching and research in the work of these scholars, this article is not intended to critique progressive principles in education but to prompt a collective self-reflection on how our progressive lenses might marginalize the voices we are supposedly working to incorporate into teacher education.

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