prokaryotes


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Related to prokaryotes: archaea, Archæa

prokaryotes

Organisms whose cells have no nucleus or membrane-bound organelle, e.g. bacteria.
References in periodicals archive ?
pneumoniae was selected as the main subject of the new investigation because it is a very small, single-cell bacteria and because it's one of the smaller prokaryotes out there today.
Archaea is widely accepted now as one of two lineages of prokaryotes, the other being Bacteria, and recent developments in genomics and proteomics have accelerated comparative biochemical studies on its members.
Valid publication of names of prokaryotes according to the rules of nomenclature: past history and current practice.
Parts of the human genome resemble bits of the simple organisms called prokaryotes, although their lineages split from ours more than it billion years ago.
The first forms of life on earth were prokaryotes (unicellular organisms that lack distinct nuclei).
In prokaryotes, bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) encapsulate enzymes associated with certain metabolic processes within a large protein shell, bringing sequentially acting enzymes into spatial proximity thus increasing local enzyme concentration, protecting the cell from potentially reactive intermediates and facilitating co-factor recycling.
Biologists provide a thorough reference to Bacillus subtilis, a favorite research subject because of its large size and genetic amenability, and so one of the best known prokaryotes. The arrangement is from small to large, inside to outside.
They are prokaryotes, lacking a cell wall (Sim et al., 2004).
Washington, August 20 (ANI): NASA-funded research has found that humans not might be walking on Earth today if not for the ancient fusing of two microscopic, single-celled organisms called prokaryotes 2.5 billion years ago, which reveals a new pathway for the evolution of life on Earth.
The ETC is the final step in cellular respiration and produces the most ATE In eukaryotes, the ETC is on the mitochondrial membrane; however, prokaryotes do not have a mitochondria and thus the ETC is on the plasma membrane.
of California-Los Angeles) presents material he uses for a course in eukaryotic transcription for graduate and upper-division undergraduate students in the molecular life sciences, and incorporates basic ideas taught in a similar course on prokaryotes. Rather than pretending that he can fit a comprehensive account of genetic transcription into a slender paperback, he focuses on a few new topics such as the basal transcriptional machinery, mechanisms of activation, and the role of chromatin.