proletarian

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Related to Proletarianisation: proletarianized

pro·le·tar·i·an

 (prō′lĭ-târ′ē-ən)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of the proletariat.
n.
A member of the proletariat; a worker.

[From Latin prōlētārius, belonging to the lowest class of Roman citizens (viewed as contributing to the state only through having children), from prōlēs, offspring; see al- in Indo-European roots.]

pro′le·tar′i·an·ism n.

proletarian

(ˌprəʊlɪˈtɛərɪən) or less commonly

proletary

adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) of, relating, or belonging to the proletariat
n, pl -tarians or -taries
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a member of the proletariat
[C17: from Latin prōlētārius one whose only contribution to the state was his offspring, from prōlēs offspring]
ˌproleˈtarianism n
ˌproleˈtarianness n

pro•le•tar•i•an

(ˌproʊ lɪˈtɛər i ən)

adj.
1. pertaining or belonging to the proletariat.
n.
2. a member of the proletariat.
[1835–45]
pro`le•tar′i•an•ism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.proletarian - a member of the working class (not necessarily employed); "workers of the world--unite!"
labor, labour, proletariat, working class - a social class comprising those who do manual labor or work for wages; "there is a shortage of skilled labor in this field"
common man, common person, commoner - a person who holds no title
dogsbody - a worker who has to do all the unpleasant or boring jobs that no one else wants to do
Adj.1.proletarian - belonging to or characteristic of the proletariat
low-class, lower-class - occupying the lowest socioeconomic position in a society

proletarian

adjective
1. working-class, common, cloth-cap (informal), plebeian the issue of proletarian world solidarity
noun
1. worker, commoner, Joe Bloggs (Brit. informal), pleb, plebeian, prole (derogatory slang, chiefly Brit.) The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains.
Translations
proletářský

proletarian

[ˌprəʊləˈtɛərɪən]
A. ADJproletario
B. Nproletario/a m/f

proletarian

[ˌprəʊlɪˈtɛəriən]
adjprolétarien(ne)
nprolétaire m/f

proletarian

adjproletarisch
nProletarier(in) m(f)

proletarian

[ˌprəʊləˈtɛərɪən] adj & nproletario/a
References in periodicals archive ?
We are further said to be experiencing 'an absolutely and totally computational capitalism [Steigler's italics]', are told that 'objects have become fully calculable', that there is 'total proletarianisation and ...
Many of the unlicensed are former co-operative fishers, half of whom now work under more or less casual arrangements for the wealthier permisionarios, while the rest are informal, independent fishers.(2) The proletarianisation of the fishing communities, the competition over restricted space, and the large number of unlicensed fishers who have limited political rights, all inevitably fragment the fishers', the entrepreneurs' and the fisher leaders' political agendas.
For the rapid proletarianisation of Black existence in the early decades of the twentieth century--occasioned by the influx of rural Africans to the City of Gold--and the subsequent unleashing of wave upon wave of cultural and economic alienation, explain just as adequately Chavafambira's psychological inertia.
Brass (1992) 'Introduction: proletarianisation and deproletarianisation on the colonial plantation' in E.
Rural depopulation with its urbanisation and proletarianisation of the peasantry is a primary symptom of cultural and social dislocation.
One of the main features of Late Capitalism is the overexploitation of invention and therefore the proletarianisation of the intellectual worker with the sole purpose of producing a continuous stream of technological revolutions.
Due to incomplete proletarianisation, less social intervention and lack of important capital investments, the populations from the aforementioned areas continued to reproduce local social relations and lifestyles that were still linked to archaic patterns.
The analysis of class formation is at the heart of the analysis by Lenhardt and Offe (1977) who present their social policy based "proletarianisation theory" which deals with "the state tackling the problem of a lasting transformation of non-waged into waged labourers" (1977:101) and is therefore directly relevant to social work.
Methods of recruitment, the nature of indenture, relations between master and servant, class formation and consciousness, issues of proletarianisation and de-proletarianisation, the role of middlemen, and the preponderance of 'pre-capitalist' ties of kinship, class and clan in these plantations figure prominently in these studies.
As a result, concepts like lixiviation, arsenic, acid water, fiscal income, proletarianisation, and the like are familiar not only to experts but to a large part of Bucaramanga's population (Prada, 2012).