proletarian

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pro·le·tar·i·an

 (prō′lĭ-târ′ē-ən)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of the proletariat.
n.
A member of the proletariat; a worker.

[From Latin prōlētārius, belonging to the lowest class of Roman citizens (viewed as contributing to the state only through having children), from prōlēs, offspring; see al- in Indo-European roots.]

pro′le·tar′i·an·ism n.

proletarian

(ˌprəʊlɪˈtɛərɪən) or less commonly

proletary

adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) of, relating, or belonging to the proletariat
n, pl -tarians or -taries
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a member of the proletariat
[C17: from Latin prōlētārius one whose only contribution to the state was his offspring, from prōlēs offspring]
ˌproleˈtarianism n
ˌproleˈtarianness n

pro•le•tar•i•an

(ˌproʊ lɪˈtɛər i ən)

adj.
1. pertaining or belonging to the proletariat.
n.
2. a member of the proletariat.
[1835–45]
pro`le•tar′i•an•ism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.proletarian - a member of the working class (not necessarily employed); "workers of the world--unite!"
labor, labour, proletariat, working class - a social class comprising those who do manual labor or work for wages; "there is a shortage of skilled labor in this field"
common man, common person, commoner - a person who holds no title
dogsbody - a worker who has to do all the unpleasant or boring jobs that no one else wants to do
Adj.1.proletarian - belonging to or characteristic of the proletariat
low-class, lower-class - occupying the lowest socioeconomic position in a society

proletarian

adjective
1. working-class, common, cloth-cap (informal), plebeian the issue of proletarian world solidarity
noun
1. worker, commoner, Joe Bloggs (Brit. informal), pleb, plebeian, prole (derogatory slang, chiefly Brit.) The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains.
Translations
proletářský

proletarian

[ˌprəʊləˈtɛərɪən]
A. ADJproletario
B. Nproletario/a m/f

proletarian

[ˌprəʊlɪˈtɛəriən]
adjprolétarien(ne)
nprolétaire m/f

proletarian

adjproletarisch
nProletarier(in) m(f)

proletarian

[ˌprəʊləˈtɛərɪən] adj & nproletario/a
References in periodicals archive ?
He has little use for either the notion of an inexorable process of proletarianization producing a progressively class conscious workforce or the idea that the conflict between tradition and modernity explains the nature of working-class behavior and consciousness.
They argue that studying the household as part of the world economy indicates that "what may look like proletarianization, or labor's increasing dependence on wages and the global market may actually turn out to be deproletarianization or declining dependence on wages and market consumption.
The increasing proletarianization and capitalization of economic life and the war-driven expansion and centralization of the British state pushed popular struggles from the local and the particular and reliance on patronage toward independent claim-making in national arenas.
Given my own work on the agrarian petite bourgeoisie in Canada, I found Wood's article on the agrarian roots of capitalism, Lewontin's chapter on the proletarianization of farmers, and Araghi's piece on the peasant question on the cusp between millennia lucid and controversial.
The process of proletarianization in the copper mining enclave involved the redefinition of miners' work according to the new tenets of company social welfare and paternalism and the gender ideology of domesticity.
If, on the other hand, the commune "is destined to perish" as a result of peasant proletarianization and land passing into the hands of the bourgeoisie, the task of revolutionaries would be "to conduct propaganda solely among the urban workers.
Further, Phillips's work makes essential connections between cultural expression and political activism, thus reorienting the proletarianization model which has long dominated labour history's treatment of Black migrants in the North.
11) Recent emphases on proletarianization or the making of a black urban industrial working class are also indebted to both the new social movements and the pioneering work of the inter-World War years.
The boom-town character of industrialization, urbanization, and proletarianization demands that cultural ways of life, usually religious, provide strategies for new personal meaning, social adjustment, and political struggle.
Moreover, these essays highlight the fact that proletarianization in Latin America has not been cataclysmic; rather, it has been a process which has occurred in fits and starts.
Helen Bradford's outstanding research suggests that, at the end of the Atkin's period in the Natal midlands, peasant access to land on white-owned ground could be substantial, and that the process of dispossession - or proletarianization - was essentially a twentieth-century phenomenon.
Three competing models of historical inquiry -- professionalization, proletarianization, and gender -- have dominated most recent revisionist nursing history, focusing on the problem of nursing's continued subordination to capital and patriarchy.