proletarian

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pro·le·tar·i·an

 (prō′lĭ-târ′ē-ən)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of the proletariat.
n.
A member of the proletariat; a worker.

[From Latin prōlētārius, belonging to the lowest class of Roman citizens (viewed as contributing to the state only through having children), from prōlēs, offspring; see al- in Indo-European roots.]

pro′le·tar′i·an·ism n.

proletarian

(ˌprəʊlɪˈtɛərɪən) or less commonly

proletary

adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) of, relating, or belonging to the proletariat
n, pl -tarians or -taries
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a member of the proletariat
[C17: from Latin prōlētārius one whose only contribution to the state was his offspring, from prōlēs offspring]
ˌproleˈtarianism n
ˌproleˈtarianness n

pro•le•tar•i•an

(ˌproʊ lɪˈtɛər i ən)

adj.
1. pertaining or belonging to the proletariat.
n.
2. a member of the proletariat.
[1835–45]
pro`le•tar′i•an•ism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.proletarian - a member of the working class (not necessarily employed); "workers of the world--unite!"
labor, labour, proletariat, working class - a social class comprising those who do manual labor or work for wages; "there is a shortage of skilled labor in this field"
common man, common person, commoner - a person who holds no title
dogsbody - a worker who has to do all the unpleasant or boring jobs that no one else wants to do
Adj.1.proletarian - belonging to or characteristic of the proletariat
low-class, lower-class - occupying the lowest socioeconomic position in a society

proletarian

adjective
1. working-class, common, cloth-cap (informal), plebeian the issue of proletarian world solidarity
noun
1. worker, commoner, Joe Bloggs (Brit. informal), pleb, plebeian, prole (derogatory slang, chiefly Brit.) The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains.
Translations
proletářský

proletarian

[ˌprəʊləˈtɛərɪən]
A. ADJproletario
B. Nproletario/a m/f

proletarian

[ˌprəʊlɪˈtɛəriən]
adjprolétarien(ne)
nprolétaire m/f

proletarian

adjproletarisch
nProletarier(in) m(f)

proletarian

[ˌprəʊləˈtɛərɪən] adj & nproletario/a
References in periodicals archive ?
The biggest hurdle would be cultural: As early as 1948, the German philosopher Joseph Pieper warned against the "proletarianization" of people and called for leisure to be the basis for culture.
The processes are Proletarianization (ibid: p 30 et passim) and Automatization (ibid: p 20) leading to the outcome of symbolic misery (Stiegler, 2014: p 1).
It presaged two modern concept purporting to explain the limited proletarianization and industrialization of the Jewish working class and gave substance to the theory by analyzing a considerable body of statistical data.
Having imagined that they would enjoy an elevated status as professionals overseas, these nurses are shocked to experience marginalization and proletarianization instead.
The left secular culture had its origins in the breakdown of the traditional religious Jewish culture and of its attendant social structures within the communities of Eastern Europe, and in the mass migration to North America sparked by the pogroms and proletarianization of the Jewish masses.
This part issue thus tries to encompass the earlier literature but also considers various approaches that go beyond a standard proletarianization narrative.
The naturalist brute and the plot of decline closely related with it, as June Howard has convincingly argued in her seminal study Form and History in American Literary Naturalism (1985), express and manage the turn-of-the-century anxieties of proletarianization. The naturalist brute draws on the former myths of savages and wild men, yet the figure is "imagined as living not outside the bounds of human society, not in the wilderness but within the very walls of the civilized city" (Howard 1985, 80).
Post-Mao reform started gradually in rural and remote provinces, proceeding through decollectivization, reforms of state and collective enterprises, proletarianization of the peasantry, emergence of an urban labor market, and re-entry into the capitalist world.
Everyone wanted to be middle class, but the word that best describes what our country is undergoing now is "proletarianization." In ancient Rome, the class known as the proletarii were too poor to pay taxes or serve in the army; all they could give the state were their proles ("offspring"--as in "prolific").
To be sure, de Rougemont overreacts to what he grasps as the ravages of proletarianization, that is, the tendency to reduce the hand to the measure of a certain alienation (here he anticipates Arendt's own hesitations regarding labor in The Human Condition), but his discussion also gives us the exact reasons for not making the same mistakes.
Despite the significant increase in proletarianization and the number of workers eligible for union membership, unionization fell from about 10 percent in 2002 to less than 6 percent in 2011.
Perhaps the agricultural sector has declined, with increased movement to cities and proletarianization based on Marxist and Maoist theories.