Prometheus


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Pro·me·the·us

 (prə-mē′thē-əs, -thyo͞os′)
n. Greek Mythology
A Titan who stole fire from Olympus and gave it to humankind, for which Zeus chained him to a rock and sent an eagle to eat his liver, which grew back daily.

[Latin Promētheus, from Greek.]

Prometheus

(prəˈmiːθɪəs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a Titan, who stole fire from Olympus to give to mankind and in punishment was chained to a rock, where an eagle tore at his liver until Hercules freed him

Pro•me•the•us

(prəˈmi θi əs, -θyus)

n.
a Titan in Greek myth who stole fire from Olympus and gave it to humankind in defiance of Zeus: in revenge, Zeus chained Prometheus to a rock where an eagle tore at his liver until he was finally released by Hercules.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Prometheus - (Greek mythology) the Titan who stole fire from Olympus and gave it to mankindPrometheus - (Greek mythology) the Titan who stole fire from Olympus and gave it to mankind; Zeus punished him by chaining him to a rock where an eagle gnawed at his liver until Hercules rescued him
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Translations
Prometeus
Prometeu

Prometheus

[prəˈmiːθjuːs] NPrometeo

Prometheus

nPrometheus m

Prometheus

[prəˈmiːθɪəs] nPrometeo
References in classic literature ?
And the poets indeed have been busy with it; for it is in effect the thing, which figured in that strange fiction of the ancient poets, which seemeth not to be without mystery; nay, and to have some approach to the state of a Christian; that Hercules, when he went to unbind Prometheus (by whom human nature is represented), sailed the length of the great ocean, in an earthen pot or pitcher; lively describing Christian resolution, that saileth in the frail bark of the flesh, through the waves of the world.
, exemplified by the Phorcides, the Prometheus, and scenes laid in Hades.
God help thee, old man, thy thoughts have created a creature in thee; and he whose intense thinking thus makes him a Prometheus; a vulture feeds upon that heart for ever; that vulture the very creature he creates.
What a range of meanings and what perpetual pertinence has the story of Prometheus! Beside its primary value as the first chapter of the history of Europe, (the mythology thinly veiling authentic facts, the invention of the mechanic arts and the migration of colonies,) it gives the history of religion, with some closeness to the faith of later ages.
It was for all the world the old story of Prometheus bound.
Once, breaking loose from our prison bonds, we dare, as mighty old Prometheus dared, to scale the Olympian mount and snatch from Phoebus' chariot the fire of the gods.
Youth, invigorated by health and lightness of spirits, requiring soon that what it loses should be immediately restored - youth knows not those endless, sleepless nights which enable us to realize the fable of the vulture unceasingly feeding on Prometheus. In cases where the man of middle life, in his acquired strength of will and purpose, and the old, in their state of natural exhaustion, find incessant augmentation of their bitter sorrow, a young man, surprised by the sudden appearance of misfortune, weakens himself in sighs, and groans, and tears, directly struggling with his grief, and is thereby far sooner overthrown by the inflexible enemy with whom he is engaged.
From Prometheus and Pronoia sprang Deucalion and Pyrrha, the only survivors of the deluge, who had a son Hellen (frag.
Sim Tappertit, among the other fancies upon which his before- mentioned soul was for ever feasting and regaling itself (and which fancies, like the liver of Prometheus, grew as they were fed upon), had a mighty notion of his order; and had been heard by the servant-maid openly expressing his regret that the 'prentices no longer carried clubs wherewith to mace the citizens: that was his strong expression.
I daresay, now, even a man fortified with a knowledge of the classics might be lured into an imprudent marriage, in spite of the warning given him by the chorus in the Prometheus."
He used to curse God, yes, that boy, sitting there on a piece of rock like a wretched little Prometheus with a sparrow peeking at his miserable little liver.
I am suffocating with happiness--I am like the Spirit of the Earth in Shelley's poem." He broke out with the magnificent lines in "Prometheus Unbound," in which the Earth feels the Spirit of Love, and bursts into speech.