propeller

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pro·pel·ler

also pro·pel·lor  (prə-pĕl′ər)
n.
A device for propelling an aircraft or boat, consisting of a spinning shaft with radiating angled blades that thrust air or water in the direction opposite the desired direction of travel.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

propeller

(prəˈpɛlə)
n
1. (Mechanical Engineering) a device having blades radiating from a central hub that is rotated to produce thrust to propel a ship, aircraft, etc
2. a person or thing that propels
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pro•pel•ler

(prəˈpɛl ər)

n.
1. a device having a revolving hub with radiating blades, for propelling an airplane, ship, etc.
2. a person or thing that propels.
3. the bladed rotor of a pump that drives the fluid axially.
4. a wind-driven, usu. three-bladed device that provides mechanical energy, as for driving an electric alternator in wind plants.
[1770–80]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

pro·pel·ler

(prə-pĕl′ər)
A device consisting of a series of twisted blades mounted around a shaft and spun to force air or water in a specific direction and thereby move an aircraft or boat.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.propeller - a mechanical device that rotates to push against air or waterpropeller - a mechanical device that rotates to push against air or water
airplane propeller, airscrew, prop - a propeller that rotates to push against air
vane, blade - flat surface that rotates and pushes against air or water
hub - the central part of a car wheel (or fan or propeller etc) through which the shaft or axle passes
mechanical device - mechanism consisting of a device that works on mechanical principles
screw propeller, screw - a propeller with several angled blades that rotates to push against water or air
variable-pitch propeller - propeller for which the angle of the blades is adjustable
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

propeller

noun prop (informal), rotor, vane an aircraft with a fixed three-blade propeller
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
دافِع، جِهاز دَفْع، مِرْوَحَه
lodní šroubvrtule
propelskrue
potkuripropelli
propeller
skrúfa
lodná skrutkavrtuľa
vijak

propeller

[prəˈpeləʳ]
A. Nhélice f
B. CPD propeller shaft N (Aer) → árbol m de la hélice (Aut) → árbol m or eje m de transmisión (Naut) → eje m portahélice
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

propeller

[prəˈpɛlər] n [boat, plane] → hélice fpropeller shaft prop shaft narbre m de transmissionpropelling pencil n (British)porte-mine m inv
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

propeller

nPropeller m; propeller blade (Aviat) → Luftschrauben-/Propellerblatt nt; (Naut) → Schraubenflügel m; propeller shaftAntriebswelle f; (Aut) → Kardanwelle f; (Naut) → Schraubenwelle f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

propeller

[prəˈpɛləʳ] nelica
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

propel

(prəˈpel) past tense, past participle proˈpelled verb
to drive forward, especially mechanically. The boat is propelled by a diesel engine.
proˈpeller noun
a device, consisting of revolving blades, used to drive a ship or an aircraft.
proˈpulsion (-ˈpalʃən) noun
the process of propelling or being propelled. jet-propulsion.
proˌpelling-ˈpencil noun
a pencil consisting of a metal or plastic case containing a lead that is pushed forward by a screwing mechanism.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Like a bolt from a crossbow my splendid craft shot its steel prow straight at the whirring propellers of the giant above us.
3000 to the Limit--that is to say, up to the point when the blades make the air "bell"--cut out a vacuum for themselves precisely as over-driven marine propellers used to do.
Presently, however, there came to my ears the whirring of the propellers of a flier, and as each moment the sound grew fainter I realized that the party had proceeded toward the south without assuring themselves as to my fate.
For example, a proportion of them, always the best marksmen, direct their fire entirely upon the wireless finding and sighting apparatus of the big guns of an attacking naval force; another detail attends to the smaller guns in the same way; others pick off the gunners; still others the officers; while certain other quotas concentrate their attention upon the other members of the crew, upon the upper works, and upon the steering gear and propellers.
With a word of farewell he touched the button which controlled the repulsive rays, and as the flier rose lightly into the air, the engine purred in answer to the touch of his finger upon a second button, the propellers whirred as his hand drew back the speed lever, and Carthoris, Prince of Helium, was off into the gorgeous Martian night beneath the hurtling moons and the million stars.
Once seated within what he already considered his new possession, the black's courage began to wane and when the motor was started and the great propeller commenced to whir, he screamed to the Englishman to stop the thing and permit him to alight, but the aviator could neither hear nor understand the black above the noise of the propeller and exhaust.
This consideration led Sir George Cayley to think only of adapting a propeller to some machine having of itself an independent power of support - in a word, to a balloon ; the idea, however, being novel, or original, with Sir George, only so far as regards the mode of its application to practice.
I had often watched her from the hotel, and wondered how she propelled herself, for apparently she had no propeller or paddles.
The modern steamship advances upon a still and overshadowed sea with a pulsating tremor of her frame, an occasional clang in her depths, as if she had an iron heart in her iron body; with a thudding rhythm in her progress and the regular beat of her propeller, heard afar in the night with an august and plodding sound as of the march of an inevitable future.
Day and night the ship throbbed to the tireless pulse of the propeller, and though one day was very like another, it was apparent to Buck that the weather was steadily growing colder.
There was thot propeller. I was after them a guid while for ut.
"Yes, they slow daown one turn o' their blame propeller," said Dan, applying himself to Manuel's conch, "fer to keep inside the law, an' that's consolin' when we're all at the bottom.