propeller

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pro·pel·ler

also pro·pel·lor  (prə-pĕl′ər)
n.
A device for propelling an aircraft or boat, consisting of a spinning shaft with radiating angled blades that thrust air or water in the direction opposite the desired direction of travel.

propeller

(prəˈpɛlə)
n
1. (Mechanical Engineering) a device having blades radiating from a central hub that is rotated to produce thrust to propel a ship, aircraft, etc
2. a person or thing that propels

pro•pel•ler

(prəˈpɛl ər)

n.
1. a device having a revolving hub with radiating blades, for propelling an airplane, ship, etc.
2. a person or thing that propels.
3. the bladed rotor of a pump that drives the fluid axially.
4. a wind-driven, usu. three-bladed device that provides mechanical energy, as for driving an electric alternator in wind plants.
[1770–80]

pro·pel·ler

(prə-pĕl′ər)
A device consisting of a series of twisted blades mounted around a shaft and spun to force air or water in a specific direction and thereby move an aircraft or boat.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.propeller - a mechanical device that rotates to push against air or waterpropeller - a mechanical device that rotates to push against air or water
airplane propeller, airscrew, prop - a propeller that rotates to push against air
vane, blade - flat surface that rotates and pushes against air or water
hub - the central part of a car wheel (or fan or propeller etc) through which the shaft or axle passes
mechanical device - mechanism consisting of a device that works on mechanical principles
screw propeller, screw - a propeller with several angled blades that rotates to push against water or air
variable-pitch propeller - propeller for which the angle of the blades is adjustable

propeller

noun prop (informal), rotor, vane an aircraft with a fixed three-blade propeller
Translations
دافِع، جِهاز دَفْع، مِرْوَحَه
lodní šroubvrtule
propelskrue
potkuripropelli
propeller
skrúfa
lodná skrutkavrtuľa
vijak

propeller

[prəˈpeləʳ]
A. Nhélice f
B. CPD propeller shaft N (Aer) → árbol m de la hélice (Aut) → árbol m or eje m de transmisión (Naut) → eje m portahélice

propeller

[prəˈpɛlər] n [boat, plane] → hélice fpropeller shaft prop shaft narbre m de transmissionpropelling pencil n (British)porte-mine m inv

propeller

nPropeller m; propeller blade (Aviat) → Luftschrauben-/Propellerblatt nt; (Naut) → Schraubenflügel m; propeller shaftAntriebswelle f; (Aut) → Kardanwelle f; (Naut) → Schraubenwelle f

propeller

[prəˈpɛləʳ] nelica

propel

(prəˈpel) past tense, past participle proˈpelled verb
to drive forward, especially mechanically. The boat is propelled by a diesel engine.
proˈpeller noun
a device, consisting of revolving blades, used to drive a ship or an aircraft.
proˈpulsion (-ˈpalʃən) noun
the process of propelling or being propelled. jet-propulsion.
proˌpelling-ˈpencil noun
a pencil consisting of a metal or plastic case containing a lead that is pushed forward by a screwing mechanism.
References in classic literature ?
Gazing at the clouds, now far beneath, the girl experienced the sensation of hanging stationary in mid-heaven; but the whirring of her propellor, the wind beating upon her, the high figures that rose and fell beneath the glass of her speedometer, these told her that her speed was terrific.
And so she drove her motor forward again and then with her firm, white teeth set in grim determination she drove the steering lever far down to port with the intention of forcing the nose of her craft straight into the teeth of the wind, and the wind seized the frail thing and toppled it over upon its back, and twisted and turned it and hurled it over and over; the propellor raced for an instant in an air pocket and then the tempest seized it again and twisted it from its shaft, leaving the girl helpless upon an unmanageable atom that rose and fell, and rolled and tumbled--the sport of the elements she had defied.
Aiming to surpass expectations when passengers arrive for their much-anticipated adventure at this modern architectural marvel, Royal Caribbean International installed a 56-foot-tall gold propellors to welcome everyone into the terminal.
The E-184 drone, which is powered by four propellors, has a cruising speed of up to 100 kilometers per hour.
Alibaba's flagship consumer-to-consumer platform Taobao, estimated to hold more than 90 per cent of the Chinese market, showed off a photo of a black and silver drone with helicopter-like propellors carrying a white box to launch the service.
Given their mild gentle nature and slow-moving behaviour, the dugong can be susceptible to many threats such as fishing nets as well as strikes upon their bodies in shallow waters by the propellors of motorised watercraft.
Each Skunk boasts eight electric motors with 16-inch propellors, lifting 45kg and carrying 4,000 pepper spray paintballs, plastic balls or other "non-lethal" ammunition.
The E-Fan is made by the mostly-French Airbus Group, and while it appears to have jet engines, those are actually "shrouded" propellors, powered by 120 lithium ion polymer batteries arranged in the aircraft's wings.
Tenders are invited for Repair and overhaul of shafting cpp system and propellors medium naval ship
Seoul, Muharram 13, 1435, November 16, 2013, SPA -- Two pilots were reported dead Saturday after their helicopter's propellors grazed the outside a 38-story high-rise in downtown Seoul, reported local fire officials.
With a flying range of 500 miles, once airborne, the two propellors fold back and propulsion is handled by an engine mounted behind the cockpit.
By getting tangled in the propellors of boats it can cause navigational problems for ships and there are fears it could cause the lake to be lost as a trout fishery.