propense


Also found in: Legal.

propense

(prəˈpɛns) or

propensive

adj
inclining forward
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Ecco dunque che L'uva puttanella, designata dall'autore come "romanzo" per non dovere troppo esporsi in prima persona e come autobiografia da una critica esitante e quasi a disagio nell'etichettarla, puo con piu pertinenza essere inserita tra i libri di memorie, di quelle magari piu propense al saggio e all'inchiesta.
We have seen an increase in deaths caused by firearms and their proliferation, especially in areas of the city characterized by high informality (favelas), where other factors come together in making them propense to high levels of criminal activity and territorial control which contribute to the proliferation of the internal market for drugs.
Hence they appear more attentive to 'facework' and more propense than the Italians to save the complainee's face, either positive or negative (Brown & Levinson 1978), across all situations.
That propense inclination which is for very wise purposes implanted in the one sex for the other, is not only necessary for the continuance of the human species; but is, at the same time, when govern'd and directed by virtue and religion, productive not only of corporeal delight, but of the most rational felicity.
If he has already authorized a considerable expense, he will be at a negative point of the value function, being more propense to the risk that he would be if he had not yet made any investment.