Propertius


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Pro·per·tius

 (prō-pûr′shəs, -shē-əs), Sextus 50?-15? bc.
Roman poet whose works include the collection Cynthia, which describes a troubled and intense love affair.

Propertius

(prəˈpɜːʃɪəs; -ʃəs)
n
(Biography) Sextus (ˈsɛkstəs). ?50–?15 bc, Roman elegiac poet
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Synopsis: "In the Flesh: Embodied Identities in Roman Elegy" by Erika Zimmermann Damer (Associate Professor of Classics and of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Richmond) deeply engages postmodern and new materialist feminist thought in close readings of three significant poets (Propertius, Tibullus, and Ovid) writing in the early years of Rome's Augustan Principate.
Their interactions focuses on the loosely narrative structure of the genre's cyclical love relationship of rejections, union, and dissolution across the nine books of elegies by Propertius, Tibullus, and Ovid, published in the first decades of Augustus's Principate between about 28 BCE and 2 BCE.
Spackman wasn't hankering after absolute fidelity: however conservative in other matters, he thought Pound's subversive version of Propertius an act of genius--but his translation of Women of Trachis is a pile of junk.
Acker spliced her letters and diary entries between slabs of appropriated texts from Charles Dickens, Sextus Propertius, Emily Bronte, and scads of others, producing surprising formal effects and willing her experience into the body of Literature.
Cynthiam adamavit Propertius quam secundam post Helenam canit.
Heuving begins this section by considering Pound's midcareer long poem Homage to Sextus Propertius (1919) and his early Cantos, in which Pound displaces a singular poetic subjectivity to constitute desire through a montage of images, curated phrases, and intertextual references.
Propertius (4.11) names Claudia Quinta in a list of virtuous Roman women, (16) but Livy describes a notorious Claudia Quinta in Book 29 of his Ab urbe condita.
When that happens in a work such as Edward FitzGerald's Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam or Ezra Pound's Homage to Sextus Propertius, the reader feels the shiver of authenticity.
Drawing heavily on Ovid, it also echoes Propertius, Tibullus, Virgil, Martial, Horace, Juvenal, and even Petronius.
I learned to write from authors like Callimachus and Meleager, including the Roman elegists (Catullus and Propertius, but less so Tibullus), and the indispensable Martial and Ausonius.