Propontis


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Propontis

(prəˈpɒntɪs)
n
(Placename) the ancient name for (the Sea of) Marmara
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Now, in this history of his, Procopius mentions that, during the term of his prefecture at Constantinople, a great sea-monster was captured in the neighboring Propontis, or Sea of Marmora, after having destroyed vessels at intervals in those waters for a period of more than fifty years.
The shores of the Straits of Sunda are unsupplied with those domineering fortresses which guard the entrances to the Mediterranean, the Baltic, and the Propontis. Unlike the Danes, these Orientals do not demand the obsequious homage of lowered top-sails from the endless procession of ships before the wind, which for centuries past, by night and by day, have passed between the islands of Sumatra and Java, freighted with the costliest cargoes of the east.
The other who was called Ocypete, or as some say Ocythoe (though Hesiod calls her Ocypus), fled down the Propontis and reached as far as to the Echinades islands which are now called because of her, Strophades (Turning Islands).
They cover the historical background of the Asia Minor dialects; agglutinative noun inflection in Cappadocian; two Turkish suffixes in Pharasoit: constraints against phrasal bases; the morphology of Silliot: paradigmatic defectiveness, paradigmatic leveling; and affix pleonasm; adverbial constructions in a dialectical context: a case study from Pontic; the Smyrna dialect: loanword adaptation in a multilingual setting; affixoids and verb borrowing in Aivaliot morphology; subtractive imperative forms in Bithynian Greek; morphological innovations in Propontis Tsakonian; and the Greek of Ottoman-era Adrianoupolis.
Having established supremacy over the waters of the Propontis (Sea of Marmara) after the victory at Cyzicus, Athens was able to control the flow of shipping via this route and collect a tax on all vessels sailing into the region from the Black Sea.
Eine Trakische Stadt an der Propontis. Heraion Teichos.
Terence Spencer observes that "a considerable number of Shakespeare's contemporaries had visited Troy (at least, they visited what were supposed to be the ruins of Homer's Troy; they were really standing on St Paul's Alexandra Troas ...)" because "nearly every boat that went to Constantinople had to wait off Tenedos, days or even weeks, for a favourable wind in order to navigate the Dardanelles and the Propontis." (14) So it was common knowledge that early modern Turkey contained the geographical location of ancient Troy, even if the idea of a continuity between the two was culturally unpalatable.
That this possibility was open to them was due to the opening up of two great regions of the export of grain--in the north from the Thracian coast and the Hellspont and Propontis and those of [the] Black Sea[,] and in the west from Sicily and lower part of Italy.
The brightening of the centre of Propontis (noted in our last Report) continued, so that it now consisted of two quite separate--but adjacent --dark spots, as shown for example on the 1937-'41 Mars map of G.
For those sailing into the Propontis from the west, Cyzicus, on a peninsula of the northwestern Anatolian coast, became a natural port with two harbors and 200 shipsheds in Strabo's day, whereas ships from the Euxine, headed west, favored the Thracian coast to the north and Perinthus.