proscenium

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Related to Proscenium theatre: Arena Theatre, Thrust theatre

pro·sce·ni·um

 (prō-sē′nē-əm, prə-)
n. pl. pro·sce·ni·ums or pro·sce·ni·a (-nē-ə)
1. The area of a modern theater that is located between the curtain and the orchestra.
2. The stage of an ancient theater, located between the background and the orchestra.
3. A proscenium arch.

[Latin proscēnium, from Greek proskēnion : pro-, before; see pro-2 + skēnē, buildings at the back of the stage.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

proscenium

(prəˈsiːnɪəm)
n, pl -nia (-nɪə) or -niums
1. (Theatre) the arch or opening separating the stage from the auditorium together with the area immediately in front of the arch
2. (Historical Terms) (in ancient theatres) the stage itself
[C17: via Latin from Greek proskēnion, from pro- before + skēnē scene]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pro•sce•ni•um

(proʊˈsi ni əm, prə-)

n., pl. -ni•ums, -ni•a (-ni ə)
1. Also called prosce′nium arch`. the arch that separates a stage from the auditorium. Abbr.: pros.
2. (formerly) the apron or, esp. in ancient theater, the stage itself.
[1600–10; < Latin proscēnium, proscaenium < Greek proskḗnion entrance to a tent, porch, stage (Late Greek: stage curtain) =pro- pro-2 + skēn(ḗ) (see scene) + -ion neuter n. suffix]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

proscenium

The wall dividing the auditorium from the stage where the proscenium arch is located.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.proscenium - the part of a modern theater stage between the curtain and the orchestra (i.e., in front of the curtain)proscenium - the part of a modern theater stage between the curtain and the orchestra (i.e., in front of the curtain)
footlights - theater light at the front of a stage that illuminate the set and actors
prompt box, prompter's box - a booth projecting above the floor in the front of a stage where the prompter sits; opens toward the performers on stage
stage - a large platform on which people can stand and can be seen by an audience; "he clambered up onto the stage and got the actors to help him into the box"
theater stage, theatre stage - a stage in a theater on which actors can perform
2.proscenium - the wall that separates the stage from the auditorium in a modern theater
proscenium arch - the arch over the opening in the proscenium wall
theater stage, theatre stage - a stage in a theater on which actors can perform
wall - an architectural partition with a height and length greater than its thickness; used to divide or enclose an area or to support another structure; "the south wall had a small window"; "the walls were covered with pictures"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

proscenium

noun
A raised platform on which theatrical performances are given:
board (used in plural), stage.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

proscenium

[prəʊˈsiːnɪəm]
A. N (prosceniums or proscenia (pl)) [prəʊˈsiːnɪə]proscenio m
B. CPD proscenium arch Nembocadura f
proscenium box Npalco m de proscenio
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

proscenium

n pl <proscenia> (also proscenium arch)Proszenium nt; proscenium stageBühne fmit Vorbühne
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Audio-visual technology is used within proscenium theatre to a very different effect in Muzamil Hayat Bhawani's works--The Black Calendar and The Country Without a Post Office.
The proscenium theatre blends uses as a classroom laboratory and a home for professional productions.
Rockwell Land has announced the development of its 600seater Proscenium Theatre at its Proscenium development in Makati.
The 474-seat Performance Hall, originally conceived as a traditional multipurpose proscenium theatre, early on shed its stage house and orchestra pit to become something that looked and behaved like a concert hall and yet well supported theatre, dance, and film (figure 3).
Western proscenium theatre gradually came to be recognized as mainstream theatre in Bangladesh, while old forms were marginalized.
Ayckbourn was quite specific when he staged the play in Scarborough in 1979 that it should be done in the round - it certainly wouldn't work in a traditional proscenium theatre.
Sorokhaibam Lalit was the father figure of Manipuri proscenium theatre. He also ran the Manipur Dramatic Union, which was a major contributor in the theatre movement of the state.
This 41,000-square-foot performing arts magnet school comprises a 250-seat proscenium theatre, a 120-seat black box theater, six light-filled dance studios of varying size, four music studios, three drama studios, and various teaching and performance support spaces, all connected to a common lobby.
In 2007, the Royal Shakespeare Company began the process of replacing its oft-maligned proscenium theatre with a modified thrust configuration much like that already available in the wildly successful Swan Theatre.
Choreographers made no attempt to set up the usual single sight-line perspective of the proscenium theatre. Rather, they established numerous variations of a field of energy.