prosthesis

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Related to Prosthesis design: prosthetic device

pros·the·sis

 (prŏs-thē′sĭs)
n. pl. pros·the·ses (-sēz)
1. An artificial device used to replace a missing body part, such as a limb, tooth, eye, or heart valve.
2. Replacement of a missing body part with such a device.
3. Linguistics Prothesis.

[Greek, addition, from prostithenai, prosthe-, to add : pros-, pros- + tithenai, to put; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

prosthesis

(ˈprɒsθɪsɪs; prɒsˈθiːsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-ˌsiːz)
1. (Surgery) surgery
a. the replacement of a missing bodily part with an artificial substitute
b. an artificial part such as a limb, eye, or tooth
2. (Phonetics & Phonology) linguistics another word for prothesis
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek: an addition, from prostithenai to add, from pros- towards + tithenai to place]
prosthetic adj
prosˈthetically adv

pros•the•sis

(prɒsˈθi sɪs for 1; ˈprɒs θə sɪs for 2 )

n., pl. -ses (-siz for 1; -ˌsiz for 2 )
1. a device, either external or implanted, that substitutes for or supplements a missing or defective part of the body.
[1545–55; < Late Latin < Greek prósthesis a putting to, addition =pros(ti)thé(nai) to put to, add (pros- to, toward + tithénai to put)]
pros•thet′ic (-ˈθɛt ɪk) adj.
pros•thet′i•cal•ly, adv.

prosthesis

An artificial attachment to replace a body part, such as a limb or organ.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prosthesis - corrective consisting of a replacement for a part of the bodyprosthesis - corrective consisting of a replacement for a part of the body
corrective, restorative - a device for treating injury or disease
glass eye - prosthesis consisting of an artificial eye made of glass
implant - a prosthesis placed permanently in tissue
obturator - a prosthesis used to close an opening (as to close an opening of the hard palate in cases of cleft palate)
pegleg, wooden leg, peg, leg - a prosthesis that replaces a missing leg
Translations

prosthesis

[prɒsˈθiːsɪs] N (prostheses (pl)) [prɒsˈθiːsiːz]prótesis f

prosthesis

[prɒsˈθiːsɪs] n (MEDICINE)prothèse f

prosthesis

n (spec)Prothese f

pros·the·sis

n. prótesis, reemplazo de una parte del cuerpo con un sustituto artificial.

prosthesis

n (pl -ses) prótesis f
References in periodicals archive ?
Prosthesis design is carried out from pre-amputation, amputation and post amputation analysis (Ministerio de Salud de Colombia, 2015), thus achieving design suited to physical and personal conditions of each (Dillon and Fatone, 2013; Murdoch, 1967; Rubiano, 2012).
Conclusions: Most studies indicated that squeaking after CoC THA was the consequence of increasing wear or impingement, caused by prosthesis design, patient characteristics, or surgical factors.
10-14) Given the variety of different rTSA prosthesis design configurations available in the worldwide marketplace, the anatomic shoulder can be altered by rTSA as follows: 1.
The common standard of clinical practice for prosthesis recommendation is to appropriately match prosthesis design and patient needs.
4 Optimal aesthetics and function, the hallmarks of a successful prosthetic treatment, depend on the careful selection of appro- priate materials, effective techniques and a suitable prosthesis design.
Amis, "The influence of tibial prosthesis design features on stresses related to aseptic loosening and stress shielding", Journal of Mechanics in Medicine and Biology, 11(1), 55-72, (2011).
Other factors are also important in analyzing the results, such as maintenance period, types of complications and failure, time and type of repair, complexity of procedures, and prosthesis design.
The MXL project uses computational modelling to define the mechanics of an artificial joint - a complex interaction of individual anatomy, prosthesis design, sizing and placement - to ensure successful surgery and longer lifespans of the prosthetic joints.
Continued refinement of prosthesis design and surgical technique will hopefully improve success rates and allow this technique to be applied to more patients with pelvic tumors.
Abstract: Using an unicompartimental knee prosthesis design a simplified calculus model was performed by means of the finite element method in order to determine the friction force between the two prosthesis components.
The finding makes sense and comes as no surprise, but the documentation of a link between younger age and increased revision rates has important implications for prosthesis design.
For both medial and lateral devices, the wear rates of CFR-PEEK against CoCrMo in this knee prosthesis design showed very promising results which could benefit future designs and performance.