proteins


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Related to proteins: Amino acids

proteins

1. Molecules made up of long chains of amino acids. They are important as enzymes and in cell structure.
2. Complex nitrogenous compounds built from amino acids; essential constituents of living cells. Protein foods are vital for the growth and repair of the body.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
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References in periodicals archive ?
Like a bad seed that overtakes an entire garden, a single abnormal protein may spoil other proteins nearby and begin the progression of Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests.
From this initial grouping, nine striatal proteins and ten hippocampal proteins were selected for identification using MALDI-ToF-MS.
Binding to dsRNA by these proteins may result in initiation of hellcase activity, concomitant with a conformational change that leads to recruiting additional cellular factors, including the recently identified IPS-1/MAVS protein (5,6).
"The Biolex team has successfully produced a wide range of human proteins and monoclonal antibodies including Plasminogen, a protein that contains multiple kringle domains similar to those in NK4," said Kunio Iwatani, CEO of Kringle Pharma.
Protein embodies any number of what are called "amino acids." The body needs 21 of these acids to build tissue, though not all proteins contain the entire series.
Research has shown that soy protein naturally contains many nutrients important for health and lacks the saturated fat and cholesterol associated with some animal proteins.
Edited by an expert in the field and with a distinguished international team of contributors, Proteins in Food Processing reviews how proteins may be used to enhance the nutritional, textural and other qualities of food products.
Cytokine: proteins (such as interleukins, tumor necrosis factor, and interferons) that are secreted by immune cells.
AxCell Biosciences, a subsidiary of Cytogen Corporation (Nasdaq:CYTO), is using IBM DB2 database technology to help its scientists chart the communication pathways within cells that enable proteins to interact and cause or prevent diseases.
Through continual adaptation, a dizzying number of our white blood cells learn to recognize a specific bacterium, virus, fungus, or even a normal cell that has become cancerous, by responding to unique proteins on the cell surfaces.
Key words: macromolecular crystallography; neutron crystallography; protein crystallography; proteins; structural biology databases; x-ray crystallography.
Latex contains a significant amount of water soluble proteins. Latex products such as gloves, condoms and surgical blooms come into contact with humans, and contaminating proteins pose health risks.