provine

provine

(prəʊˈvaɪn)
vb (tr)
(Agriculture) to plant (a vine) in preparation for propagation
References in periodicals archive ?
In Sanaa provine, the warplanes of aggression launched two airstrikes Sharia area of Bani-Hoshaish district, and five air strikes on Heshaishiah area of Sha'wb district in the capital, while an airstrike was waged on a civilian's farm in Shahera area of Hamdan district.
Additionally, Rowan has divested the Cecil Provine in November 2017 for scrap and has cold-stacked the Gorilla IV following the conclusion of its latest contract.
Chavez afirmo que su crecimiento provine principalmente de las pequenas y medianas empresas, dijo: "es aqui donde los distribuidores han sabido aprovechar ese nicho de mercado poco concurrido y donde su margen de utilidad es mayor".
Brandon McElhose, Dale Miller, Kasie Mobley, Katie Mobley, Adora Morse, Clayton Oilar, Alexia Olsen, Shane Orme, Francis Pardo, Allia Petersen, Daniel Phillips, Jonathan Phillips, Matthew Pilling, Danielle Provine, Harley Rook, Samantha Ruppert, Kevin Rutledge, Jesse Sagen, Scott Sanders-Anderson, Kayla Schwarzkopf, Trevor Shaw, Julia Smith, Austin Smith, Kaitlyn Steelman, Ashlee Stevenson, Michael Taylor-Crespin, Blake Utter, Brayden Van Cleve, Cheyanne Vosburg, Joshua Voyles, Mason Walker, Anthoney Winders, Jerry Winters, Kaylee Wolgamott, Jessica Yost and Teja Zellers.
Laughter is the sound of play, and play is good," says Robert Provine, Ph.
sw aCi " The search area is around Kinsa Cocha in Calca Provine near Cusco in the south east of the country.
This phenomenon has been named by Provine (1993) 'punctuation effect', because laughter usually occurs where punctuation would be found in a transcript.
The American psychologist, Robert Provine, when he embarked on his own studies two decades ago, put it beautifully: "Given the universality of the sound, our ignorance about the purpose and meaning of laughter is remarkable.
Yeh, Deepak Ramachandran, Benjamin Douglas, Adwait Ratnaparkhi, William Jarrold, Ronald Provine, Peter F.
Neuroscientist Robert Provine of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County has long suspected that human laughter evolved from labored breathing during rough-and-tumble play of a common ancestor of people and chimps.
Increased stress is associated with decreased immune system response, says Provine.