phalanx

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Related to Proximal phalanx: Distal phalanx

pha·lanx

 (fā′lăngks′, făl′ăngks′)
n. pl. pha·lanx·es or pha·lan·ges (fə-lăn′jēz, fā-)
1. A compact or close-knit body of people: "formed a solid phalanx in defense of the Constitution and Protestant religion" (G.M. Trevelyan).
2. A formation of infantry carrying overlapping shields and long spears, developed by Philip II of Macedon and used by Alexander the Great.
3. pl. phalanges Anatomy A bone of a finger or toe. Also called phalange.

[Latin phalanx, phalang-, from Greek.]

phalanx

(ˈfælæŋks)
n, pl phalanxes or phalanges (fæˈlændʒiːz)
1. (Military) an ancient Greek and Macedonian battle formation of hoplites presenting long spears from behind a wall of overlapping shields
2. any closely ranked unit or mass of people: the police formed a phalanx to protect the embassy.
3. a number of people united for a common purpose
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in Fourierism) a group of approximately 1800 persons forming a commune in which all property is collectively owned
5. (Anatomy) anatomy any of the bones of the fingers or toes.
6. (Botany) botany
a. a bundle of stamens, joined together by their stalks (filaments)
b. a form of vegetative spread in which the advance is on a broad front, as in the common reed. Compare guerrilla
[C16: via Latin from Greek: infantry formation in close ranks, bone of finger or toe]

pha•lanx

(ˈfeɪ læŋks, ˈfæl æŋks)

n., pl. pha•lanx•es for 1-6, pha•lan•ges (fəˈlæn dʒiz for 7.)
1. (in ancient Greece) a group of heavily armed infantry formed in ranks and files close and deep, with shields joined and long spears overlapping.
2. any body of troops in close array.
3. a number of persons united for a common purpose.
4. a compact or closely massed body of persons, animals, or things.
5. (in Fourierism) a group of about 1800 persons, living together and holding their property in common.
6. any of the bones of the fingers or toes.
[1545–55; < Latin < Greek phálanx military formation, bone of finger or toe, wooden roller]

phalanx

an ancient military formation of serried ranks surrounded by shields; hence, any crowded mass of people or group united for a common purpose.
See also: Crowds

Phalanx

 a line or array of battle; a compact group of people or animals prepared for attack or defence; a body of persons or things drawn up together in a common purpose.
Examples: phalanx of cavaliers and dames, 1837; of elms, 1891; of Greeks, 1983; of infantry; of lawyers, 1817; of sheep, 1785; of soldiers, 1553; of migrating storks, 1733.

phalanx

A Greek military formation of ranked armored hoplites.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phalanx - any of the bones of the fingers or toesphalanx - any of the bones of the fingers or toes
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
dactyl, digit - a finger or toe in human beings or corresponding body part in other vertebrates
2.phalanx - any closely ranked crowd of people
crowd - a large number of things or people considered together; "a crowd of insects assembled around the flowers"
3.phalanx - a body of troops in close array
military force, military group, military unit, force - a unit that is part of some military service; "he sent Caesar a force of six thousand men"
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"

phalanx

noun
Related words
adjective phalangeal
Translations
falangi
falanga

phalanx

[ˈfælæŋks] N (phalanges (pl)) [fæˈlændʒiːz]falange f

phalanx

n pl <-es or phalanges>
(Anat) → Finger-/Zehenglied nt, → Phalanx f (spec)
(= body of people, troops)Phalanx f

pha·lanx

n. falange, uno de los huesos largos de los dedos de los pies o las manos.
References in periodicals archive ?
CHS of the calcaneus and the talus were more likely to metastasise.12 Phalangeal CHS occurs far more frequently in the hand compared with the foot, and majority of the cases are located in the proximal phalanx.13 To the best for our knowledge no case of primary chondrosarcoma of toe with grade 3 unclear features, with orbital and infratemporal metastases has been reported as yet.
(5) Two other case reports of successful treatment of osteoid osteoma in the proximal phalanx have been published.
(1) In his study published in 1962, he found that 25 of 39 patients who sustained a rupture of the thumb ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) from the first proximal phalanx at the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint had interposition of the adductor pollicis aponeurosis.
The asymmetry of the base of the proximal phalanx, which exhibits a more prominent radial tubercle (Fig.
X-ray of the left foot demonstrated peripheral cortical erosions, periosteal thickening, sclerosis, and multiple lytic lesions involving the proximal phalanx of the great toe.
The UCL at the MCPJ originated from the ulnar aspect of the dorsal tubercle of the first metacarpal and inserted into the base of the proximal phalanx. The UCL was mainly stabilized by the adductor aponeurosis (AA), which lay superficial to the UCL and attached at the ulnar aspect of the proximal phalanx [Figure 1] and [Figure 2].
He had complex soft-tissue defects contaminated with tar and exposed bone and tendon at the level of distal interphalangeal joint of the second finger and tissue defects also contaminated with tar which, beginning at the mid-part of the proximal phalanx of the third finger and extending to the fingertip at the ulnar side, enclosed the half of the mid-axis of the finger with exposed flexor tendon and bone [Figure 1].
Active electrode was placed over the abductor pollicis brevis, and the reference electrode was placed over the proximal phalanx of the thumb.
A midlateral skin incision of approximately 1 cm was made over the distal ulnar side of the proximal phalanx. The ulnar lateral band was moved aside dorsally, and the distal ulnar side of the proximal phalanx was exposed subperiosteally.
Similar cone-shaped epiphyses were found in the proximal phalanx of the great toe and up to the fourth one of both feet with shortness of all toes (Figure 5).
The entire palmar surface of the proximal phalanx was resurfaced with a full thickness skin graft.

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