Prudentius


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Prudentius

(pruːˈdɛnʃəs)
n
(Biography) Aurelius Clemens (ɔːˈriːlɪəs ˈklɛmɛnz). 348–410 ad, Latin Christian poet, born in Spain. His works include the allegory Psychomachia
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Prudentius Aroh, in a brief remark, explained that the Archbishop built the centre with the support of friends, adding that contrary to the action of the Biblical King Herod who beheaded John The Baptist on his birthday, Archbishop Okeke is handing over a skill acquisition centre to inmates on his own birthday.
His research has concentrated on philosophy and literature in late antiquity, and his books include Plotinus' Philosophy of the Self (1973), Augustine's Philosophy of Mind (1987), The Poetry of Boethius (1991), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2004), and Days Linked by Song: Prudentius' Cathemerinon (2012).
The same questions of deception, reprimand, and consolation travel through the early Christian tradition, as is clear in the work of Boethius, Augustine, and Prudentius. Boethius's sixth-century Consolation of Philosophy, everywhere present in the previous three cantos' discussion of love and free will, includes a reprimand remarkably like that of Dante's "holy and alert" lady.
This is the psychomachia--the name of a specific work by the early fifth-century Latin poet of Spanish origin, Prudentius (c.
Crawford's critique of allegorical discourse begins with arguably the first consistent literary allegory, Prudentius's Psychomachia.
The opening line recalls "percussa solis spiculo" ("Stuck by the sun's beam") from Prudentius's Morning Hymn (Hymni II.
(223) The earliest western reference to the returning Vikings appears in the Annates Bertiniani, which Prudentius, who was Bishop of Troyes during the nineth century, wrote.
Matt 27:37; Mark 15:26), early medieval writers from Augustine and Prudentius to Bede and Alcuin hailed Hebrew, Greek, and Latin, in which Jesus of Nazareth, the King of the Jews was written by Pontius Pilate above the cross.
Is it possible they in some way represent Prudentius's Seven Vices or his Seven Champions or Gregory's later list of Seven Deadly Sins?
ASD V.2 contains 5 annotated writings that relate to pastoral care and a commentary on 2 hymns by Prudentius. First of all, these concern "A sermon on the immense mercy of God," De immensa Dei misericordia concio (1524), (28) intended for pupils at the school run by John Colet (1468-1519) in London, that particularly struck a chord in Italy.
(9) At the same time, a large number of Christian hymns, most prominently those of Ambrose, Prudentius, and Sedulius, were composed in forms that adhered to the classical rules of syllable quantity, which indicates the strong classical background of the early Christian hymnodists; as the hymns were intended to be sung, such prosodic considerations would otherwise appear inconsequential.
16.5; Minucius Felix, Octavius 28.7; Prudentius, Apotheosis line 197.