Prussianism


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Prussianism

(ˈprʌʃəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the ethos of the Prussian state and aristocracy, esp militarism and stern discipline
2. (Historical Terms) the ethos of the Prussian state and aristocracy, esp militarism and stern discipline
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Prus•sian•ism

(ˈprʌʃ əˌnɪz əm)

n.
the militaristic spirit, system, policy, or methods historically associated with the Prussians.
[1855–60]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Prussianism

the theories, actions, and principles of the Prussians. — Prussian, n., adj.
See also: Government
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
Patriotism rots into Prussianism when you pretend it is the first virtue.
Others, like the Berlin daily "Taz" see reactionary Prussianism being resurrected from the crypts of the House of Hohenzollern.
Justice Department "breathe[d] the arrogant spirit of Prussianism" into America and the words amounted to "seditous treason." Id.
Carritt, 'Hegel and Prussianism', Philosophy (April 1940), pp 190-6; (July 1940), pp 315-17.
A sort of (sic) Prussianism is born to produce an army with a nation in place of a nation with an army.
(78) "Whilom Pacifist Returns from War Front with Message to Others that Prussianism Must be Crushed for Existence of Civilization," Oregonian (March 3, 1918), 16.
In the course of the debate Jack (John Arthur) Fihelly, the volatile assistant minister for justice in the Ryan government, attacked John Redmond as 'useless', England as 'the home of cant, humbug and hypocrisy' and British policy in Ireland as 'the mailed fisted policy of Prussianism'.
Knox, 'Hegel and Prussianism' in Walter Kaufmann (ed.), Hegel's Political Philosophy, New York, Atherton Press, 1970.
His 1905 essay "Autocracy and War" had warned darkly of "Prussianism" as "the enemy," and in Victory, published in March 1915, he had repeatedly described the odious hotelier Schomberg as "Teutonic'--a racial epithet, like "Hun" (coined by the Mail's own Lovat Fraser), whose currency owed much to the Harmsworth press (Notes 93; Victory 20).
By believing the organization's momentum is more important than its individual parts, the British administrators perpetuate the very Prussianism they think they oppose.
And nowhere was this truer than in Germany, whose postwar government was imposed precisely to dismantle the traditional Right, understood as the "source" of Nazism and "Prussianism." The Allies not only demonized the Third Reich, according to Schrenck-Notzing, but went out of their way, until the onset of the Cold War, to marginalize anything in German history and culture that was not associated with the Left, if not with outright communism.