Psalter


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Psal·ter

also psal·ter  (sôl′tər)
n.
A book containing the book of Psalms or a particular version of, musical setting for, or selection from it.

[Middle English, from Old English psaltere and Old French psaultier, both from Late Latin psaltērium, from Latin, psaltery, from Greek psaltērion; see psaltery.]

Psalter

(ˈsɔːltə)
n
1. (Bible) another name for Psalms, esp in the version in the Book of Common Prayer
2. (Bible) a translation, musical, or metrical version of the Psalms
3. (Bible) a devotional or liturgical book containing a version of Psalms, often with a musical setting
[Old English psaltere, from Late Latin psaltērium, from Greek psaltērion stringed instrument, from psallein to play a stringed instrument]

Psal•ter

(ˈsɔl tər)

n.
1. the Biblical book of Psalms.
2. (sometimes l.c.) psalmbook.
[before 900; Middle English sauter (< Anglo-French), Old English saltere < Late Latin psaltērium the Psalter, Latin: a psaltery < Greek psaltḗrion, derivative (with -tērion n. suffix) of psállein to pluck]

Psalter

 of bishops: bishops collectively.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Psalter - a collection of Psalms for liturgical usePsalter - a collection of Psalms for liturgical use
prayer book, prayerbook - a book containing prayers
Book of Common Prayer - the Anglican service book of the Church of England; has had several revisions since the Reformation and is widely admired for the dignity and beauty of its language
Translations

psalter

[ˈsɔːltəʳ] Nsalterio m

psalter

nPsalter m

psalter

[ˈsɔːltəʳ] nsalterio
References in classic literature ?
She tried several ballads, but found them inadequate; till, recollecting the psalter that her eyes had so often wandered over of a Sunday morning before she had eaten of the tree of knowledge, she chanted: "O ye Sun and Moon ...
1539, under the direction of Archbishop Cranmer, Coverdale issued a revised edition, officially authorized for use in churches; its version of the Psalms still stands as the Psalter of the English Church.
The Book of Common Prayer, now used in the English Church coordinately with Bible and Psalter, took shape out of previous primers of private devotion, litanies, and hymns, mainly as the work of Archbishop Cranmer during the reign of Edward VI.
There was brother Bartholomew with a crucifix of rare carved ivory, and brother Luke With a white-backed psalter adorned with golden bees, and brother Francis with the "Slaying of the Innocents" most daintily set forth upon vellum.
Then haste thee to some solitary grove, And bear wise Bacon's and Albertus' works, The Hebrew Psalter, and New Testament; And whatsoever else is requisite We will inform thee ere our conference cease.
Hebrew Wordplay and Septuagint Translation Technique in the Fourth Book of the Psalter
or the fibre that knits them, the sound of the turned Psalter
In the nearly 40 years since the advent of the 1979 Book of Common Prayer, the re-translation of the Psalter created for that book has become a standard, used not only by Episcopalians, but adopted by others into their own worship service books and liturgies.
Rentz's case studies, such as the Prick of Conscience window of 1410 in All Saints North Street, York; the Trotton Doom (West Sussex) wall painting, with its Corporal Works of Mercy; and agrarian metaphors, in texts by Chaucer and Langland and in image in the Luttrell Psalter, give structure to what could be a diffuse analysis.
Hudson, Anne, ed., Two Revisions of Rolle's English Psalter Commentary and the Related Canticles: V olume III (EETS, O.S.
Origen, in the third century, set about composing commentaries on the entire Psalter, thereby expanding the scope and methodology of biblical exegesis.
(3) Critics have not, however, explored the flowering wand's relationship to the play's final scene, in which Mary reads her psalter and extols the virtues of her audience doing the same.