Pseudo-Dionysius


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Pseudo-Dionysius

(ˌsjuːdəʊˌdaɪəˈnɪsɪəs)
n
(Biography) the name given to the unidentified author (c. 500 ad) of important theological works formerly attributed to Dionysius the Areopagite
References in periodicals archive ?
As a supplement to his exposition of Aquinas's aesthetic, Sevier devotes his fifth chapter to comparing that aesthetic with two of its strongest influences: pseudo-Dionysius and Albert the Great.
Among the topics are Proclus in the history of philosophy: construction and deconstruction, Marinus' Abrahamic notions of the soul and one, the transfiguration of Proclus' legacy: pseudo-Dionysius and the late Neoplatonic school of Athens, Ibn al-Tayyib's Istithmar on Proclus' commentary on the Pythagorean Golden Verses, and understanding the geometric method: prolegomena to a study of a Procline influence in Spinoza as mediated through Abraham Cohen Herrera.
The work most influential on both Eastern and Western Christian thought about angels, Hankey says, was a book called The Celestial Hierarchy, written in the 5th century by Pseudo-Dionysius, a Syrian Christian.
I cited Latin, Greek, Syriac, and Coptic, the original often being necessary for the language of restoration, but I always translated Syriac and Coptic, and Greek when the passages were long or difficult, for example in Pseudo-Dionysius.
In the fifth and sixth centuries elements of Platonism were incorporated into Christian theology by thinkers such as Pseudo-Dionysius the Aeropagite.
16) Drawing on Pseudo-Dionysius and the larger Christian-Platonic tradition, he observes that the goodness of creation stands in a certain relation to beauty.
Drawing here on ideas of apophasis in Pseudo-Dionysius, Lazenby focuses her attention on the failure or limits of artistic expression as represented through the character of Lily Briscoe in To the Lighthouse and Miss La Trobe in Between the Acts.
Cole moves adroitly through over two thousand years of intellectual history, highlighting various models of the dialectic used by Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus, Pseudo-Dionysius, Nicholas of Cusa, and Hegel.
Also, in a paper not included in this bibliography, McLaughlin has shown that Muntzer's Taulerian mysticism is non-Platonic, thus bringing him closer in this important area of his thought to Luther, who was influenced by Tauler but rejected Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite.
In this sense, Maritain stands closer to Pseudo-Dionysius than to Maximus--closer to an ontology in which finite particulars are almost arbitrary signs.
Saints Alive, informed by Williams' knowledge and experience of the Middle Ages and Catholic tradition, notes the paradox of words as "both revered and suspect"; he cites Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite to identify distrust of verbal language and question its implied place above image and gesture in Western culture (21).