Pseudo-Dionysius


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Pseudo-Dionysius

(ˌsjuːdəʊˌdaɪəˈnɪsɪəs)
n
(Biography) the name given to the unidentified author (c. 500 ad) of important theological works formerly attributed to Dionysius the Areopagite
References in periodicals archive ?
I cited Latin, Greek, Syriac, and Coptic, the original often being necessary for the language of restoration, but I always translated Syriac and Coptic, and Greek when the passages were long or difficult, for example in Pseudo-Dionysius.
16) Drawing on Pseudo-Dionysius and the larger Christian-Platonic tradition, he observes that the goodness of creation stands in a certain relation to beauty.
Cole moves adroitly through over two thousand years of intellectual history, highlighting various models of the dialectic used by Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus, Pseudo-Dionysius, Nicholas of Cusa, and Hegel.
In this sense, Maritain stands closer to Pseudo-Dionysius than to Maximus--closer to an ontology in which finite particulars are almost arbitrary signs.
Saints Alive, informed by Williams' knowledge and experience of the Middle Ages and Catholic tradition, notes the paradox of words as "both revered and suspect"; he cites Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite to identify distrust of verbal language and question its implied place above image and gesture in Western culture (21).
Like Aquinas, Young follows the Christian Neoplatonism of the so-called Pseudo-Dionysius (fifth-century?
Tracing a line of thought that extends from Plato through pseudo-Dionysius and Meister Eckhart to Heidegger, Gersh maintains that Derrida is well aware of the parallels between negative theology and deconstruction's notion of the trace.
Denis, consisted in the equalization of Pseudo-Dionysius with Saint-Denis, the patron saint of France; it came to have significant art historical ramifications, because abbot Suger, who in the 12th century was supposed to rebuild the abbey church of St.
A sixth-century writer we call Pseudo-Dionysius outlined nine choirs of angels and their job descriptions, which are cross-referenced with biblical examples of each.
Karampetsos (comparative literature, College of Southern Nevada), building on Dante's reference to the Pseudo-Dionysius in the Divine Comedy, contends that Dante's work contains evidence of the important role played by Byzantine art, aesthetics, and theology in his use of images.
500) of the author known as Pseudo-Dionysius (the text which established the system of angelic taxonomy and hierarchy which persisted for a millennia), through Peter Lombard, Bonaventure, and Aquinas (who, it turns out, never really did wonder how many angels could dance on the head of a pin), through the Archangel Michael's role as mediator between earth and heaven.
Pfefferl comments on the influences exhibited in the different works: Weigel drew on Paracelsian and pseudo-Paracelsian works; he was influenced by the mysticism of Meister Eckhardt, Johannes Tauler, and the Theologica Deutsch; he knows Pseudo-Dionysius, Boethius, Martin Luther, Hugh of St Viktor, Sebastian Franck.