colitis

(redirected from Pseudomembranous colitis)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

co·li·tis

 (kə-lī′tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of the colon. Also called colonitis.

colitis

(kɒˈlaɪtɪs; kə-) or

colonitis

n
(Pathology) inflammation of the colon
colitic adj

co•li•tis

(kəˈlaɪ tɪs, koʊ-)

n.
inflammation of the colon.
[1855–60]

colitis

Inflammation of the large intestine or colon. It may result from a viral or bacterial infection, causing pain and severe diarrhea.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.colitis - inflammation of the colon
Crohn's disease, regional enteritis, regional ileitis - a serious chronic and progressive inflammation of the ileum producing frequent bouts of diarrhea with abdominal pain and nausea and fever and weight loss
irritable bowel syndrome, mucous colitis, spastic colon - recurrent abdominal pain and diarrhea (often alternating with periods of constipation); often associated with emotional stress
ulcerative colitis - a serious chronic inflammatory disease of the large intestine and rectum characterized by recurrent episodes of abdominal pain and fever and chills and profuse diarrhea
inflammation, redness, rubor - a response of body tissues to injury or irritation; characterized by pain and swelling and redness and heat
Translations
kolitida
paksunsuolen tulehdus

colitis

[kɒˈlaɪtɪs] Ncolitis f

colitis

[kɒʊˈlaɪtɪs kəˈlaɪtɪs] ncolite f

colitis

[kɒˈlaɪtɪs] n (Med) → colite f

co·li·tis

n. colitis, infl. del colon;
chronic ______ crónica;
pseudomembranous ______ mucomembranosa;
spasmodic ______ espasmódica;
ulcerative ______ ulcerativa.

colitis

n colitis f; ischemic — colitis isquémica; microscopic — colitis microscópica; pseudomembranous — colitis seudomembranosa; ulcerative — colitis ulcerosa
References in periodicals archive ?
difficile) is a spore-forming pathogen that typically causes symptoms in individuals with altered gut microbial flora, releasing toxins that can result in a range of disease manifestations from asymptomatic colonization to diarrhea, pseudomembranous colitis, toxic megacolon, intestinal perforation, or, in the most severe cases, death.
One case of pseudomembranous colitis in a breastfeeding infant and 2 cases of green teeth in neonates have been reported with ciprofloxacin use.
Clinical and endoscopic findings in patients early in the course of clostridium difficile-associated pseudomembranous colitis.
Patients with diarrhoea and demonstrable pseudomembranous colitis at endoscopy or at histopathology were also diagnosed as having CDAD.
Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic gram-positive bacterium that is considered an emerging pathogen and currently responsible for the majority of the nosocomial diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis cases in humans.
While it is tempting to believe treatment with a broad spectrum antibiotic is preferable, particularly if the causative pathogen has not been identified, the more widely acting the antibiotic, the more likely it will kill off normal bacterial flora and allow superinfections to develop, such as oral or vaginal candidiasis (thrush) or, more seriously, pseudomembranous colitis (see box 1, p24).
Her illness progressed to fulminant Clostridium difficile pseudomembranous colitis that required total colectomy.
This pattern of bowel wall enhancement has been observed in patients with radiation enteritis, GVHD, ischemic bowel, intramural hemorrhage, vasculitides such as Henoch-Schonlein purpura, and pseudomembranous colitis.
In 1974, researchers demonstrated 21% of patients treated with the antibiotic clindamycin (Cleocin[R]) reported diarrhea; 10% of the study population developed pseudomembranous colitis as a consequence of this treatment (Bartlett, Moon, Chang, Taylor, & Onderdonk, 1978).
Pseudomembranous colitis has been reported with nearly all antibacterial agents and may range from mild to life-threatening; therefore, it is important to consider this diagnosis in patients who present with diarrhea subsequent to the administration of antibacterial agents.
In 1978, they found that the toxins released by Clostridium were seen in the stools of patients with antibiotic-associated pseudomembranous colitis.
Although pseudomembranous colitis has been the hallmark of infection, the clinical presentation of CDI may range from asymptomatic colonization to severe diarrhea, toxic megacolon, perforation and even death.