pseudoscorpion

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Related to Pseudoscorpions: Whip scorpions

pseudoscorpion

(ˌsjuːdəʊˈskɔːpɪən)
n
(Zoology) another name for false scorpion
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pseudoscorpion - small nonvenomous arachnid resembling a tailless scorpion
arachnid, arachnoid - air-breathing arthropods characterized by simple eyes and four pairs of legs
book scorpion, Chelifer cancroides - minute arachnid sometimes found in old papers
References in periodicals archive ?
High-resolution photographic negatives of live pseudoscorpions were projected onto a digitizing tablet and the coordinates of 38 points along the dorsal outline of the body and right pedipalp were recorded on computer file (see Zeh and Zeh 1992b for details).
New records of pseudoscorpions (Arachnida: Pseudoscorpiones) from Chiapas, Mexico.
Though only distantly related to their namesake, pseudoscorpions resemble miniature scorpions without the trademark tail and stinger.
Pseudoscorpions of the family Pseudochiridiidae are very difficult to collect because of their small size.
Harvey (1991) listed 32 valid fossil pseudoscorpions derived from Myanmar, Chinese, Baltic, and Dominican amber (see also Spahr 1993:12-20).
These defenses are most effective against microarthropod predators such as the Mesostigmata and pseudoscorpions.
These arthropod fungivores (for the sake of simplicity, all arthropods that ingest detritus and/or graze fungal mycelia will be referred to as "fungivores") are preyed upon by a wide range of arthropod predators, such as mires, beetles, ants, pseudoscorpions, centipedes, and spiders (Swift et al.
modiglianii during 1986 while identifying Indonesian specimens of pseudoscorpions (Harvey 1988), and made observations on the chelicerae and female genitalia.
The distribution of the pseudoscorpions in the different components of the nests is analyzed.
Small numbers of two species of pseudoscorpions, Tyrannnochthonius imitatus Hoff and Ideobisium puertoricense Muchmore were present in most bamboo and forest litter samples, neither of which were observed to prey on any organism.