psoralen

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Related to Psoralens: ichthyosis

pso·ra·len

 (sôr′ə-lən)
n.
Any of a group of chemical compounds found in certain plants, used to treat psoriasis and vitiligo.

[From New Latin Psōralea, plant genus, from Greek psōralea, neuter pl. of psōraleos, mangy (from the appearance of the plants' leaves), from psōrā, itch.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

psoralen

(ˈsɔːrəˌlɛn)
n
(Pharmacology) any of various naturally occurring photoreactive chemicals, found in some plants, some of which are used in the treatment of skin disorders such as psoriasis and vitiligo.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

psoralen

n psoraleno; — plus ultraviolet A (PUVA) psoraleno más luz ultravioleta A
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The damage types include photoproducts--pyrimidine dimers, intra-strand bonds, large adducts resulting from exposure to aflatoxin, benzopyrene, psoralens, or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.
However, the fresh root contains psoralens that are known to promote tumours.
A range of novel PRTs for blood products that involve the combined use of ultraviolet light and reagents such as psoralens or riboflavin are available (35,36).
The treatment includes topical substances (corticosteroids, immunomodulators, UV exposure, lasers, etc.), combined with systemic substances (psoralens, antioxidants); there are also other additional controversial treatments (Bologna et al 2012; Griffiths et al 2016).
The drugs which are often associated with photosensitivity reactions are NSAIDs (e.g., ibuprofen, ketoprofen, piroxicam, diclofenac), cardiovascular drugs (furosemide, amiodarone, thiazides), antibiotics (tetracyclines, ciprofloxacin, sulfonamides), psoralens, neuroleptic drugs such as phenothiazines (especially chlorpromazine), oral contraceptives, retinoids (isotretinoin, acitretin), antifungals, etc.
Bennett, "Bullous pemphigoid: occurrence in psoriasis treated with psoralens plus long-wave ultraviolet radiation," Archives of Dermatology, vol.
However, CPEOs are characterized by high percentages of nonvolatile residues, which contain hydrocarbons, sterols, fatty acids, waxes, carotenoids, coumarins, psoralens, and flavonoids [8].
Psoralens must be used with caution because of their phototoxic properties; other known side effects of this class of drugs include nausea, pruritus and increased contrast between the lesion and normally pigmented skin.
(1,2) It is a nonimmune reaction caused by exposure to chemicals called furocoumarins and psoralens, found in a variety of plants and fruits such as lemons, limes, celery, parsnips, figs, carrots, dill, mustard, and rindweed.1,2
The most frequently cited drugs that cause photo-onycholysis are tetracyclines, psoralens, and fluoroquinolones.