polydipsia

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Related to Psychogenic polydipsia: diabetes insipidus

pol·y·dip·si·a

 (pŏl′ē-dĭp′sē-ə)
n.
Excessive or abnormal thirst.

[poly- + Greek dipsa, thirst + -ia.]

pol′y·dip′sic adj.

polydipsia

(ˌpɒlɪˈdɪpsɪə)
n
(Pathology) pathol excessive thirst
[C18: New Latin, from poly- + -dipsia, from Greek dipsa thirst]
ˌpolyˈdipsic adj

pol•y•dip•si•a

(ˌpɒl iˈdɪp si ə)

n.
excessive thirst.
[1650–60; < New Latin < Greek polydíps(ios) very thirsty (poly- poly- + dípsios thirsty) + -ia -ia]

polydipsia

extreme thirst; an abnormal and continuous craving for drink.
See also: Alcohol
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polydipsia - excessive thirst (as in cases of diabetes or kidney dysfunction)
thirst, thirstiness - a physiological need to drink
diabetes - a polygenic disease characterized by abnormally high glucose levels in the blood; any of several metabolic disorders marked by excessive urination and persistent thirst
Translations

pol·y·dip·si·a

n. polidipsia, sed insaciable.
References in periodicals archive ?
Psychogenic polydipsia is an important differential diagnosis, as it is characterized by similar symptoms of polydipsia and polyuria.
Suffice to mention, anti-impulsivity, anti-suicidality, anti-aggressivity, dual diagnosis, schizo-affective, augmentation in unipolar depression, cyclothymia, cycloid psychosis, Klein–Levine syndrome, borderline personality, clozapine-induced neutropenia, augmentation in schizophrenia, psychogenic polydipsia, just to name few.
self-induced vomiting and laxative and diuretic misuse) [20] or excessive water intake by psychogenic polydipsia, rather than excessive compulsive exercising [21].
Rhabdomyolysis after correction of hyponatremia in psychogenic polydipsia possibly complicated by ziprasidone.
Parrot 2 had a 6-month history of decreased activity and vocalizing, with an extended history of excessive water intake; a water deprivation test ruled out diabetes insipidus, and psychogenic polydipsia was suspected.
Exclusion criteria included treatable causes of nocturia, such as diabetes insipidus and cardiac failure, and medical conditions that increased risk, such as hyponatremia and psychogenic polydipsia.