psychosomatic

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psy·cho·so·mat·ic

(sī′kō-sō-măt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to physical symptoms that are thought to originate from mental or emotional causes.
2. Relating to or concerned with the influence of the mind on the body, and the body on the mind, especially with respect to disease: psychosomatic medicine.

psy′cho·so·mat′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

psychosomatic

(ˌsaɪkəʊsəˈmætɪk)
adj
1. (Psychology) of or relating to disorders, such as stomach ulcers, thought to be caused or aggravated by psychological factors such as stress
2. (Pathology) of or relating to disorders, such as stomach ulcers, thought to be caused or aggravated by psychological factors such as stress
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

psy•cho•so•mat•ic

(ˌsaɪ koʊ səˈmæt ɪk, -soʊ-)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to a physical disorder that is caused or notably influenced by emotional factors.
2. pertaining to or involving both the mind and the body.
[1860–65]
psy`cho•so•mat′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

psychosomatic

Describes physical disorders resulting at least partly from psychological factors.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.psychosomatic - used of illness or symptoms resulting from neurosis
psychoneurotic, neurotic - affected with emotional disorder
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

psychosomatic

adjective (all) in the mind, psychological, unconscious, subconscious, subjective, irrational, unreal Doctors refused to treat her, saying her problems were psychosomatic.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
psychosomatický

psychosomatic

[ˈsaɪkəʊʊˈmætɪk] ADJpsicosomático
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

psychosomatic

[ˌsaɪkəʊʊˈmætɪk] adjpsychosomatique
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

psychosomatic

adjpsychosomatisch; psychosomatic medicinePsychosomatik f, → psychosomatische Medizin
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

psychosomatic

[ˌsaɪkəʊsəʊˈmætɪk] adjpsicosomatico/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

psy·cho·so·mat·ic

a. psicosomático-a, rel. al cuerpo y a la mente;
___ symptomsíntoma ___.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

psychosomatic

adj psicosomático
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Michael, he said, was suffering from a somatic symptom disorder, popularly known as psychosomatic illness. His pain was real, but its origin was psychological, not physical.
Islam, for example, actively addresses psychosomatic illness. Prophet Muhammad is credited with saying excessive worry makes physical illness in a person'.
Specifically, the findings shed new light on how stress, depression and other mental states can alter organ function, and show that there is a real anatomical basis for psychosomatic illness.
The Wellcome Book Prize, an annual award that is open to new works of fiction or nonfiction that has a central theme of medicine, health or illness, announced on Monday that consultant neurologist Suzanne O'Sullivan is the winner of this year's GBP30,000 prize for her book about psychosomatic illness.
Lubitz reportedly suffered from a severe psychosomatic illness, depression and had vision problems.
[2] describe the "psychosomatic family" as featuring enmeshment, rigidity, overprotectiveness, and lack of conflict resolution and the children affected by brittle diabetes as having difficulty in handling stress, showing a tendency to internalize anger and being somewhat immature in their ability to cope with challenging situations) and their overgeneralizations of these overall "weak" findings on familial situations in one psychosomatic illness to various psychosomatic illnesses.
(9) This is the tip of the iceberg in ways that sufferers can be taken advantage of or outright harmed by those seeking to profit from their psychosomatic illness, and the claims made by businesses trying to sell to Morgellon's sufferers rapidly become ugly in nature.
The emotional disengagement, the compensatory behaviour to reward oneself for all the stress experienced, the bouts of aggression in the face of helplessness, and so forth all contribute to maladaptive and ineffective behaviour patterns that may become entrenched and eventually lead to severe syndromes such as depression, excessive anxiety and panic, high blood pressure, and psychosomatic illness.
Many years ago an expert committee convened by the World Health Organization recommended that the words psychosomatic medicine and psychosomatic illness should be avoided because when these terms are used they imply most diseases (i.e., those that are not psychosomatic) are either purely physical or purely psychological.
Its insights invite readers to reconsider their own views of psychosomatic illness, as well as to revisit the much-studied subject of hysteria in new terms.
Somatic fixation can occur not only in cases in which the illness has traditionally been thought to have a large psychological component, such as hypochondriasis (excessive preoccupation about a disease), somatization disorder (psychiatric diagnosis applied to patients who persistently complain of varied physical symptoms that have no identifiable physical origin), and psychosomatic illness (the illness may be emotional or mental in origin but have physical symptoms), but also in conditions like chronic pain, cancer, diabetes, or sickle cell disease.