psychosis

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Related to Psychotic illness: Psychotic episode

psy·cho·sis

 (sī-kō′sĭs)
n. pl. psy·cho·ses (-sēz)
An acute or chronic mental state marked by loss of contact with reality, disorganized speech and behavior, and often hallucinations or delusions, seen in certain mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia, and other medical disorders.

psychosis

(saɪˈkəʊsɪs)
n, pl -choses (-ˈkəʊsiːz)
(Psychiatry) any form of severe mental disorder in which the individual's contact with reality becomes highly distorted. Compare neurosis
[C19: New Latin, from psycho- + -osis]

psy•cho•sis

(saɪˈkoʊ sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
1. a mental disorder characterized by symptoms, as delusions or hallucinations, that indicate impaired contact with reality.
2. any severe form of mental disorder, as schizophrenia or paranoia.
[1840–50]

psy·cho·sis

(sī-kō′sĭs)
Plural psychoses (sī-kō′sēz)
A mental illness so severe that a person loses the ability to think logically, to communicate, and to relate to others. A person with a psychosis loses contact with reality and often shows dramatic changes in behavior. Psychoses can be caused by diseases affecting the brain.

psychotic (sī-kŏt′ĭk) adjective

psychosis

any severe mental disorder or disease. — psychotic, n., adj.
See also: Insanity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.psychosis - any severe mental disorder in which contact with reality is lost or highly distorted
mental disease, mental illness, psychopathy - any disease of the mind; the psychological state of someone who has emotional or behavioral problems serious enough to require psychiatric intervention
delirium tremens, DTs - acute delirium caused by alcohol poisoning
paranoia - a psychological disorder characterized by delusions of persecution or grandeur
dementia praecox, schizophrenia, schizophrenic disorder, schizophrenic psychosis - any of several psychotic disorders characterized by distortions of reality and disturbances of thought and language and withdrawal from social contact
Translations
psychóza
psykoosi
psychoza
psihoză

psychosis

[saɪˈkəʊsɪs] N (psychoses (pl)) [saɪˈkəʊsiːz]psicosis f inv

psychosis

[saɪˈkəʊsɪs] [psychoses] [saɪˈkəʊsiːz] (pl) npsychose f

psychosis

n pl <psychoses> → Psychose f

psychosis

[saɪˈkəʊsɪs] n (psychoses (pl)) [saɪˈkəʊsiːz‘]psicosi f inv

psy·cho·sis

n. psicosis, trastorno mental severo de origen orgánico o emocional en el cual el paciente pierde contacto con la realidad y sufre de alucinaciones o aberraciones mentales;
alcoholic ______ alcohólica;
depressive ______ depresiva;
drug ______ por drogas;
manic-depressive ______ maníaco depresiva;
organic ______ orgánica;
senile ______ senil;
situational ______ situacional;
toxic ______ tóxica;
traumatic ______ traumática.

psychosis

n (pl -ses) psicosis f
References in periodicals archive ?
It can induce paranoia and anxiety and hallucinations and has been found in studies to increase the risk psychotic illness in people who regularly use potent forms of cannabis such as skunk.
When a person presents with a psychotic illness, such as schizophrenia, they are at an increased risk of self-harm or suicide.
The subjects with psychiatric diagnoses were grouped into: psychotic illness, mood disorders, substance use disorder, and 'not mentally ill' [Tables B].
Patients with an acute psychotic illness deserve a suitable and safe environment to assist their recovery and enable them to reach a point where it is safe to progress to community-based care.
Nielsson said Payam might have also been suffering from a psychotic illness when he killed Naser, although it was hard to say as he was now being treated with anti-psychotic medication.
And the NHS points to the hazards of using the drug: "It affects your ability to drive, will cause lung disease if smoked and regular use can lead to psychotic illness.
People who are at risk of psychotic illness like schizophrenia or bipolar disorder increase their risk even more when using cannabis.
There are others who cite the potentially serious side effects, such as psychotic illness.
A PRISONER who killed his cellmate after "hearing voices" does not suffer from a psychotic illness, a psychologist has told a trial.
Central nervous system stimulants, like Vyvanse, may cause psychotic or manic symptoms, such as hallucinations, delusional thinking, or mania, even in individuals without a prior history of psychotic illness," the FDA statement said.