Ptolemaist

Related to Ptolemaist: Ptolemais

Ptol·e·ma·ist

 (tŏl′ə-mā′ĭst)
n.
An adherent of or believer in the Ptolemaic system.

Ptolemaist

(ˌtɒlɪˈmeɪɪst)
n
(Astronomy) a believer in or adherent of the Ptolemaic system of the universe

Ptolemaist

a supporter of the Ptolemaic explanation of planetary motions.
See also: Astronomy
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Why," he asked, "if nature is inherently simple, do planets execute the excruciatingly complex orbits demanded by the geocentric perspective of the Ptolemaist?" His answer to this exceptionally complex question was elegantly simple -- the sun, not the Earth, was the center of the solar system.
Pierre Duhem located the remote origins of the discipline in the sharp contrast of a causal realist conception of science to the positivist saving of the appearances, historically exemplified by the debates between Aristotelians and Ptolemaists. In the modern period, the positivists seem to have gained the upper hand, but their dominance has been problematic.
Back in 3000BC, Egyptian pharaohs marched their armies and built fortifications all along the Nile; later the Ptolemaists of Egypt raided the interior to obtain gold, slaves and above all, their famous fighting elephants.
After all, the perspectivalism of the levanicentric view held by the inhabitants of the Earth's "moon" corresponds inversely to the geocentric perspective of the anti-Copernicans, the Ptolemaists, who still dominated seventeenth-century astronomy.
After all, the perspectivalism of the levanicentric view held by the inhabitants of the Earth's "moon" corresponds inversely to the geocentric perspectivalism of the anti-Copernicans, the Ptolemaists, who still dominated seventeenth-century astronomy.
Feyerabend's paradigmatic historical example of counterinduction is Galileo's use of the seemingly unreliable telescope to support anomaly-ridden Copernicanism and thus to confound the Ptolemaists.
(19) The classic history of the debate between the Aristotelians and the Ptolemaists remains Pierre Duhem, To Save the Phenomena: An Essay on the Idea of Physical Theory from Plato to Galileo, trans.