publican

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pub·li·can

 (pŭb′lĭ-kən)
n.
1. Chiefly British The keeper of a public house or tavern.
2. A collector of public taxes or tolls in the ancient Roman Empire.
3. A collector of taxes or tribute from the public.

[Middle English, tax collector, from Old French, from Latin pūblicānus, from pūblicum, public revenue, from neuter of pūblicus, public; see public.]

publican

(ˈpʌblɪkən)
n
1. (Commerce) (in Britain) a person who keeps a public house
2. (Brewing) (in Britain) a person who keeps a public house
3. (Historical Terms) (in ancient Rome) a public contractor, esp one who farmed the taxes of a province
[C12: from Old French publicain, from Latin pūblicānus tax gatherer, from pūblicum state revenues]

pub•li•can

(ˈpʌb lɪ kən)

n.
1. Chiefly Brit. the owner or manager of a tavern.
2. (in ancient Rome) a public contractor, esp. one who contracted for the collection of taxes.
3. any collector of taxes, tolls, or the like.
[1150–1200; Middle English < Latin pūblicānus. See public, -an1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.publican - the keeper of a public house
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
barkeep, barkeeper, barman, bartender, mixologist - an employee who mixes and serves alcoholic drinks at a bar
tapper, tapster - a tavern keeper who taps kegs or casks
Translations
صَاحِبُ حَانَةصاحِب حانَه
hospodskýhostinský
værthusholderværtshusindehaver
pubinpitäjä
vlasnik puba
kráareigandi
パブの主人
술집 주인
pubinnehavare
เจ้าของและผู้จัดการบาร์
chủ quán rượu

publican

[ˈpʌblɪkən] N
1. (Brit) → dueño/a m/f or encargado/a m/f de un pub or bar
2. (Bible) → publicano m

publican

[ˈpʌblɪkən] npatron(ne) m/f de pub, gérant(e) m/f de pub

publican

n
(Brit) → Gastwirt(in) m(f)
(Hist: = tax collector) → Zöllner m

publican

[ˈpʌblɪkən] n (Brit) → gestore m ( or proprietario) di un pub

publican

(ˈpablikən) noun
the keeper of a public house.

publican

صَاحِبُ حَانَة hospodský værthusholder Wirt ταβερνιάρης dueño de un bar pubinpitäjä propriétaire de pub vlasnik puba gestore di pub パブの主人 술집 주인 caféhouder pubinnehaver właściciel piwiarni dono de pub трактирщик pubinnehavare เจ้าของและผู้จัดการบาร์ bar işletmecisi chủ quán rượu 酒吧老板
References in classic literature ?
The publicans are all obedience to their commands, never hesitating to let them run up scores without limit, knowing that, when their own money is expended, the purses of their employers must answer for the bill, or the voyage must be delayed.
The lady faints away at the doors of charitable publicans, and the gentleman being accommodated with three-penny worth of brandy to restore her, lays an information next day, and pockets half the penalty.
And to be sure it is very hard upon us to be obliged to pay them, and to keep 'um too, as we publicans are.
In jumping at Publicans and Sinners they would forget that a word might be said for the worries of Scribes and Pharisees; and this defect or limitation might have recommended their own daughter-in-law to them at this moment as a fairly choice sort of lost person for their love.
Bulstrode's close attention was not agreeable to the publicans and sinners in Middlemarch; it was attributed by some to his being a Pharisee, and by others to his being Evangelical.
A shilling's worth a quarter; but keep your lamps out for thruppenny-bits, or the publicans 'll shove 'em on you for sixpence.
Now, Mrs Varden, regarding the Maypole as a sort of human mantrap, or decoy for husbands; viewing its proprietor, and all who aided and abetted him, in the light of so many poachers among Christian men; and believing, moreover, that the publicans coupled with sinners in Holy Writ were veritable licensed victuallers; was far from being favourably disposed towards her visitor.
After his return he called Matthew from the receipt of customs, performed some cures, and created scandal by eating with publicans and sinners.
The traveller who stops at the best houses, so called, soon discovers this, for the publicans presume him to be a Sardanapalus, and if he resigned himself to their tender mercies he would soon be completely emasculated.
Preparations were in progress for a moral little Mill somewhere on the rural circuit, and other Professors were backing this or that Heavy-Weight as good for such or such speech-making hits, so very much after the manner of the sporting publicans, that the intended Resolutions might have been Rounds.
These men, who under the leadership of the tall lad were drinking in the dramshop that morning, had brought the publican some skins from the factory and for this had had drink served them.
said the publican, with a confused, beery idea of being good-natured.