publican

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pub·li·can

 (pŭb′lĭ-kən)
n.
1. Chiefly British The keeper of a public house or tavern.
2. A collector of public taxes or tolls in the ancient Roman Empire.
3. A collector of taxes or tribute from the public.

[Middle English, tax collector, from Old French, from Latin pūblicānus, from pūblicum, public revenue, from neuter of pūblicus, public; see public.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

publican

(ˈpʌblɪkən)
n
1. (Commerce) (in Britain) a person who keeps a public house
2. (Brewing) (in Britain) a person who keeps a public house
3. (Historical Terms) (in ancient Rome) a public contractor, esp one who farmed the taxes of a province
[C12: from Old French publicain, from Latin pūblicānus tax gatherer, from pūblicum state revenues]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pub•li•can

(ˈpʌb lɪ kən)

n.
1. Chiefly Brit. the owner or manager of a tavern.
2. (in ancient Rome) a public contractor, esp. one who contracted for the collection of taxes.
3. any collector of taxes, tolls, or the like.
[1150–1200; Middle English < Latin pūblicānus. See public, -an1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.publican - the keeper of a public house
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
barkeep, barkeeper, barman, bartender, mixologist - an employee who mixes and serves alcoholic drinks at a bar
tapper, tapster - a tavern keeper who taps kegs or casks
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
صَاحِبُ حَانَةصاحِب حانَه
hospodskýhostinský
værthusholderværtshusindehaver
pubinpitäjä
vlasnik puba
kráareigandi
パブの主人
술집 주인
pubinnehavare
เจ้าของและผู้จัดการบาร์
chủ quán rượu

publican

[ˈpʌblɪkən] N
1. (Brit) → dueño/a m/f or encargado/a m/f de un pub or bar
2. (Bible) → publicano m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

publican

[ˈpʌblɪkən] npatron(ne) m/f de pub, gérant(e) m/f de pub
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

publican

n
(Brit) → Gastwirt(in) m(f)
(Hist: = tax collector) → Zöllner m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

publican

[ˈpʌblɪkən] n (Brit) → gestore m ( or proprietario) di un pub
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

publican

(ˈpablikən) noun
the keeper of a public house.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

publican

صَاحِبُ حَانَة hospodský værthusholder Wirt ταβερνιάρης dueño de un bar pubinpitäjä propriétaire de pub vlasnik puba gestore di pub パブの主人 술집 주인 caféhouder pubinnehaver właściciel piwiarni dono de pub трактирщик pubinnehavare เจ้าของและผู้จัดการบาร์ bar işletmecisi chủ quán rượu 酒吧老板
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
(64) " Redeat haec inquiens ad sententiam Domini, ut si evangelice et secundo ac tertio correptus non se correxerit, qui ab illo sicut ethnicus et publicanus haberi praecipitur, legis severitatem a principe necesse est sustinere cogatur, ne qui sibi consulere noluit, in pace vivere volentibus nocere possit " (HINCMAR, 1852, p.
In it, Christ contrasts the prayer of a tax collector ("publicanus") to that of a Pharisee: