pucelle


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Related to pucelle: Jeanne d'Arc

pucelle

(pjʊˈsɛl)
n
obsolete a maid or virgin
Also called: puzzel
References in periodicals archive ?
32)" As might be suggested by the fact that Danton reads La Pucelle, Voltaire's mockepic of Joan of Arc, while in his prison cell waiting to be guillotined, his incompatibility crosses over from literary analogy to political reality: in contrast to heroes of historical drama before him, Danton is unable to incorporate the body of the people and function as a secular version of the sacral king.
Fronton Du Duc, The Tragic History of the Pucelle of Domremy Otherwise Known as the Maid of Orleans, Richard Hillman (ed.
Pucelle or puzzel, Dolphin or dogfish, Your hearts I'll stamp out with my horse's heels, And make a quagmire of your mingled brains.
Islamic, Italian, and French art flourished with certain leaders of creativity including, Leonardo Da Vinci, Jean Pucelle, Giotto di Bondone and Filippo Brunelleschi, artist and engineer.
One might as well ask what is being repressed by refusal to reference Joan la Pucelle in subsequent plays.
The section's opening chapter examines characters for whom "girl" signifies "peevish" or "perverse" behavior: Joan La Pucelle (7 Henry VI), Silvia (Two Gentlemen of Verona), Kate and Bianca (The Taming of the Shrew) and Juliet.
En Europa, la grisalla (del frances grisaille) fue utilizada en los libros miniados, como el famoso libro de horas de Jean Pucelle para Jeanne d'Evreux, reina de Francia, en la primera mitad del siglo xIV.
The second part of Rivette's career, which would see him complete a dozen more features, was safer and saner, reflecting decisions made on behalf of life over art--not a betrayal of the concerns of his earlier work, but a more "reasonable" application of them: L'amour par terre (Love on the Ground, 1984), Hurlevent (Wuthering Heights, 1985), La bande des quatre (Gang of Four, 1989), La belle noiseuse (1991), Jeanne la Pucelle (Joan the Maid; in two parts, both 1994), Haut bas fragile (Up, Down, Fragile, 1995), Secret defense (1998), Va savoir (Who Knows?
Of special note is the inclusion of maps and illustrations, a bibliography, a timeline for Jehanne la Pucelle, and the Julian Calendar of 1429.
In Henry VI part one, the Dauphin and Joan la Pucelle (Joan of Arc) fly off and provide shoddy excuses for doing so, despite their earlier boasting and bravado.
In the early Henry VI plays, actual devils appear alongside the witch Joan La Pucelle in Part I; and, in Part II, a demon named Asmath is conjured by Margery Jourdain at the behest of Eleanor, Duchess of Gloucester.
Such a capacious definition allows Williams to study an entire range of girls, including Joan La Pucelle, Ophelia, Queen Isabella, and even Romeo and Macbeth, as well as historical girls inspired by Shakespeare's works.