punched card

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Related to Punched cards: Difference engine, Analytical engine

punched card

or

punch card

n
(Computer Science) (formerly) a card on which data can be coded in the form of punched holes. In computing, there were usually 80 columns and 12 rows, each column containing a pattern of holes representing one character. Sometimes shortened to: card
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.punched card - a card on which data can be recorded in the form of punched holespunched card - a card on which data can be recorded in the form of punched holes
card - one of a set of small pieces of stiff paper marked in various ways and used for playing games or for telling fortunes; "he collected cards and traded them with the other boys"
Translations

punched card

[ˌpʌntʃtˈkɑːd] punch card (esp Am) n (Comput) → scheda perforata
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for Supply and installation of 120 hook jacquard with accessories and punched cards for saree design
The punched cards reflected the rug motifs, wanting us to believe that everything that has order has music.
The works also aptly evoke the nineteenth-century punched cards of the automated Jacquard loom, which famously inspired Charles Babbage to use punched cards for his Analytical Engine design and eventually led to the first IBM punched card and early digital computing.
I assume the company you worked for has something called "time punched cards"?
She was Lord Byron's daughter and worked alongside Charles Babbage preparing the punched cards for his difference engine.
History enthusiast Essinger tracks the evolution of Jacquard's machine, a set of punched cards that directed patterns produced on silk looms, finding that Jacquard adapted (but did not invent) the system primarily to corner the silk weaving market.
What made his machine unique was the use of punched cards that, when strung together, produced the same pattern with each use, Shortly thereafter, mathematician Charles Babbage recognized the potential of Jacquard's idea and put it to use in a computer that he called the Analytical Engine.
The Jacquard loom used punched cards and a control unit that allowed a skilled user to program detailed patterns on the loom.
The hand-loom in question was a device which wove silk threads according to a pattern determined by a series of 24,000 punched cards. The inventor of this loom was Joseph-Marie Jacquard.
The new, huge computers still used punched cards, but worked more quickly and quietly.
Numbers recorded on punched cards guided the movement of NC machines in cutting parts.
Among them were automatic telephone switching, the electric typewriter, duplicating machines and copiers, adding machines and calculators, tape recorders for dictation, and data-processing equipment that used punched cards.