punched card

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Related to Punched cards: Difference engine, Analytical engine

punched card

or

punch card

n
(Computer Science) (formerly) a card on which data can be coded in the form of punched holes. In computing, there were usually 80 columns and 12 rows, each column containing a pattern of holes representing one character. Sometimes shortened to: card
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.punched card - a card on which data can be recorded in the form of punched holespunched card - a card on which data can be recorded in the form of punched holes
card - one of a set of small pieces of stiff paper marked in various ways and used for playing games or for telling fortunes; "he collected cards and traded them with the other boys"
Translations

punched card

[ˌpʌntʃtˈkɑːd] punch card (esp Am) n (Comput) → scheda perforata
References in periodicals archive ?
Image Credit: Image Credit: The artist's project in Abu Dhabi included Afghan carpet patterns Image Credit: Image Credit: Image Credit: Traditional cross-stitch patterns are interpreted into punched cards that translate them into music Image Credit: Image Credit: Zsanett Szirmay with her work Image Credit: By Archana R.
The works also aptly evoke the nineteenth-century punched cards of the automated Jacquard loom, which famously inspired Charles Babbage to use punched cards for his Analytical Engine design and eventually led to the first IBM punched card and early digital computing.
Remember the Christmas wreaths fashioned from stacks of discarded punched cards sprayed with gold paint?
What made his machine unique was the use of punched cards that, when strung together, produced the same pattern with each use, Shortly thereafter, mathematician Charles Babbage recognized the potential of Jacquard's idea and put it to use in a computer that he called the Analytical Engine.
The Jacquard loom used punched cards and a control unit that allowed a skilled user to program detailed patterns on the loom.
The new, huge computers still used punched cards, but worked more quickly and quietly.