Punic War


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Punic War

n.
Any of the three wars (264-241, 218-201, and 149-146 bc) fought between Rome and Carthage, resulting ultimately in the destruction of Carthage and the gain by the Romans of its territory in Sicily, Sardinia, Corsica, Africa, and Spain.
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Noun1.Punic War - one of the three wars between Carthage and Rome that resulted in the destruction of Carthage and its annexation by RomePunic War - one of the three wars between Carthage and Rome that resulted in the destruction of Carthage and its annexation by Rome; 264-241 BC, 218-201 BC, 149-146 BC
Aegates Isles, Aegadean Isles - islands west of Sicily (now known as the Egadi Islands) where the Romans won a naval victory over the Carthaginians that ended the first Punic War in 241 BC
Cannae - ancient city is southeastern Italy where Hannibal defeated the Romans in 216 BC
Battle of Lake Trasimenus, Lake Trasimenus - a battle in 217 BC in which Hannibal ambushed a Roman army led by Flaminius
Metaurus River - a battle during the second Punic War (207 BC); Hannibal's brother Hasdrubal was defeated by the Romans which ended Hannibal's hopes for success in Italy
battle of Zama, Zama - the battle in 202 BC in which Scipio decisively defeated Hannibal at the end of the second Punic War
References in periodicals archive ?
3 The Third Punic war was officially brought to an end in 1985 when the Mayor of Rome and the Mayor of Carthage met to sign a treaty of friendship.
The Second Punic War, where Hannibal famously marched his elephants across the Alps in a failed attack on Rome, has been regarded as one of the pivotal events of European history.
After Hannibal's death in 181-183 BC, Carthage's fortunes flipped when it was colonised by the Romans after the Third Punic War.
Lewis examines six major wars, devoting one chapter each to the Greco-Persian wars, the Theban wars, the Second Punic War, the campaigns of the Roman emperor Aurelian, the American Civil War, and two chapters to World War II.
He describes Rome before and after the First Punic War and its expansion in Italy, the Mediterranean, and beyond; its expansion in Italy and the East from 238 to 228 BC; the Gallic War; and the consequences of expansion, including the Second Illyrian War and Carthaginian expansion in Spain and the Roman response.
He was leading the armies of Carthage, from north Africa, against the emerging Roman Empire during the second Punic War in 218BC.
This project, therefore, includes a quantitative study of the productive capacity of the Carthaginian empire in the late third century BC; an analysis of the logistics during the Second Punic War (218-201 BC); an appreciation of the relationship of war veterans with agricultural production at this chronological context; and a comparison of these results with those obtained in a specific casus: a survey of part of the territory under the rule of the Phoenician city of Utica, a North-African city under the Carthaginian rule.
The Romans routinely destroyed whole cities of their enemies, such as Carthage following the Third Punic War.
The Third Punic War finally saw Carthage fall to Rome, though the city was later reconstructed as New Carthage.
Even Polybius' later collaboration with Rome n his presence in the Roman camp during the Third Punic War, and his mediation with the Roman authorities at the end of the Achaean War--does not indicate any conversion; Baronowski's analysis of the multiple and complex reasons behind Polybius' political decisions in this difficult period is definitely one of the best parts of the book.
Beyond the first chapter, which opens with a dazzling scene of young Hannibal watching his baby brother sacrificed to appease Baal Hammon (based on Jakob Seibert's speculation in Hannibal [1993] that Hamilcar Barca had four sons, the youngest of which was a victim of Carthage's notorious practice of human sacrifice), the book is not so much a biography as it is a fairly standard, albeit well-written and solidly argued, military analysis of the Second Punic War.
Cabiria is set against the backdrop of the second Punic war during the third century BC.