Punic

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Pu·nic

 (pyo͞o′nĭk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to ancient Carthage, its inhabitants, or their language.
2. Having the character of treachery attributed to the Carthaginians by the Romans.
n.
The dialect of Phoenician spoken in ancient Carthage.

[Latin Poenicus, Pūnicus, from Poenus, a Carthaginian, from Greek Phoinix, Phoenician.]

Punic

(ˈpjuːnɪk)
adj
1. (Historical Terms) of or relating to ancient Carthage or the Carthaginians
2. (Peoples) of or relating to ancient Carthage or the Carthaginians
3. (Historical Terms) characteristic of the treachery of the Carthaginians
n
4. (Languages) the language of the ancient Carthaginians; a late form of Phoenician
5. (Historical Terms) the language of the ancient Carthaginians; a late form of Phoenician
[C15: from Latin Pūnicus, variant of Poenicus Carthaginian, from Greek Phoinix]

Pu•nic

(ˈpyu nɪk)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to the ancient Carthaginians.
2. treacherous; perfidious.
n.
3. the language of ancient Carthage, a form of late Phoenician.
[< Latin Pūnicus, earlier Poenicus Carthaginian =Poen(us) a Phoenician, a Carthaginian (akin to Greek Phoînix a Phoenician) + -icus -ic]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Punic - the Phoenician dialect of ancient CarthagePunic - the Phoenician dialect of ancient Carthage
Phoenician - the extinct language of an ancient Semitic people who dominated trade in the ancient world
Adj.1.Punic - of or relating to or characteristic of ancient Carthage or its people or their language; "the Punic Wars"; "Carthaginian peace"
2.Punic - tending to betraypunic - tending to betray; especially having a treacherous character as attributed to the Carthaginians by the Romans; "Punic faith"; "the perfidious Judas"; "the fiercest and most treacherous of foes"; "treacherous intrigues"
unfaithful - not true to duty or obligation or promises; "an unfaithful lover"
Translations

Punic

[ˈpjuːnɪk]
A. ADJpúnico
B. Npúnico m

Punic

adjpunisch; the Punic Warsdie Punischen Kriege
References in classic literature ?
Yet, if for fame and glory aught be done, Aught suffered--if young African for fame His wasted country freed from Punic rage-- The deed becomes unpraised, the man at least, And loses, though but verbal, his reward.
We fill ourselves with ancient learning, install ourselves the best we can in Greek, in Punic, in Roman houses, only that we may wiselier see French, English and American houses and modes of living.
Theycover the various periods of Phoenician heritage: the Origin (Lebanon, Cyprus and Greece); the Punics and the Sea (Italy, Malta and Tunisia) and the Expansion (France and Spain).
It brings together 30 Mediterranean coastal cities founded or visited by the Canaanites, Phoenicians and the Punics -- three civilizations that share a common past dating back around 5,000 years.
Summary: A newly created league bringing together ancient Canaanite, Phoenician and Punic cities held its second-ever convention last week in Byblos [Jbeil], pledging closer ties between member countries.
BEIRUT: A newly created league bringing together ancient Canaanite, Phoenician and Punic cities held its second-ever convention last week in Byblos [Jbeil], pledging closer ties between member countries.
The League of the Canaanite, Phoenician and Punic Cities was founded by Maha al-Khalil Chalabi, secretary general of the International Committee for the Safeguarding of Tyre, in March of this year, with support from UNESCO.
The Punics were convinced that death was the start of new life, to be greeted with a smile," he added.
15: Poeni homines immolare et pium er diis immortalibus gratissimum ease duxerunt ("The Punics considered sacrificing humans an act both righteous and most pleasing before the immortal gods").
Its Punic texts have generally excited the most interest in the play as a source for linguistic studies.
Surprisingly, this unilateral view of the Punic people is not supported in the overall presentation of Hanno, the principal (and probable title) character of the Poenulus.
They were called Punics and it was on the island of Motya that 15,000 of them lived in comfort and considerable affluence until in 397 BC the Greeks first besieged Motya, then burned it, along with its temple, its idols, its fine houses and its people.